The Participatory Condition: Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing

Together with Alessandro Delfanti we have just finished writing a chapter on the forthcoming book “The Participatory Condition“, forthcoming on the University of Minnesota Press.

The chapter is titled: “Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing“, and it deals with La Cura project, which we created when Salvatore Iaconesi became diseased with brain cancer, and decided to turn the situation into a biopolitical performance interweaving hacking, society, anthropology and sciences.

From the chapter:

“While patient reclamation of the medicalized body is becoming a more common subject of discussion, by proposing the concept of the ritual we have here focused on the cultural significance of biodigital data: once liberated through hacking from their objectifying role in the context of medical institution, open source data provides a commons upon which new forms of digital solidarity can emerge.47 In doing so they can trigger public responses which enable collective reappropriations of the experience of cancer and other illnesses. Against techno-determinist ideologies, we also suggest that, by performing such rituals, members of digital countercultures—such as hackers—can turn to digital technologies, rather than only their bodies, as a battleground for the reconfiguration of social and political possibilities.”

The chapter will be featured in the forthcoming “The Participatory Condition“, a book resulting from the international dialogues originating from “#PCond. The Participatory Condition“, an International Colloquium held in Montreal at the Museum of Contemporary Art on November 15 and 16, 2013. The Colloquium’s main objective was to assess the role of media in the development of a principle whose expansion has become so large as to become the condition of our contemporaneity. The book is forthcoming and will be published in 2016.

The chapter, in an early, pre-release version, can be accessed at: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0744f82b#

You can cite the chapter as:

Delfanti, A. and Iaconesi, S., “Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing,” in Barney, D., Coleman, G., Ross, C., Sterne, J. and Tembeck, T. (eds): The Participatory Condition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press (forthcoming).

 

 

Human Ecosystems in New Haven

Art is Open Source, Yale World Fellows and the City of New Haven present:

“HENHV” – Human Ecosystems New Haven.
The digital life of a city

Opening Ceremony
December 9th, 2014 | 10.30-11:30am
New Haven City Hall |165 Church St, New Haven
Guests of Honor:
Mayor Tony Harp, Doug Hausladen (City of New Haven), Michael Morand, Professor Alan Plattus, Dr. Michael Cappello (Yale University)

Interactive Exhibit and Closing Party
December 12 | 4:00pm
Yale Center for Engineering Innovation and Design |15 Prospect St, New Haven

December 4, 2014, New Haven – From December 9-12, New Haven’s City Hall will feature the exhibit “Human Ecosystems New Haven: The Digital Life of the City.” Inaugurated by Mayor Tony Harp, the event marks the launch of a project combining art, research, innovation and real-time open data: one that effectively turns New Haven into a “Human-Driven Smart City.” 

Human Ecosystems: Joy in New Haven

Human Ecosystems: Joy in New Haven

PRESS RELEASE:

Yale World Fellow Salvatore Iaconesi (philosopher, robotics engineer, artist, hacker and near-future designer) and his partner Oriana Persico (communications scientist, writer, cultural and social analyst) created the global project “Human Ecosystems” in 2013. This year, the project comes to New Haven. Human Ecosystems captures, in real time, public conversations happening on major social networks in 29 languages.

The enormous amount of data harvested from social networks through the Human Ecosystems project can help city administrators, activists, organizers, artists, designers, researchers and citizens explore New Haven in completely new ways. This new source of real-time, open data will be publicly accessible and will remain in New Haven indefinitely.

As citizens, we have no idea how much information we’re producing on an hourly basis,” says Iaconesi. “We produce it everyday with our online expressions, but at the moment it’s only the social network operators, large corporations and secret services worldwide that can access them. With Human Ecosystems we give back this data to the community, creating a new digital commons, and we can teach people how to use it for their own purposes.

Love in New Haven

Love in New Haven

Since their arrival in August, Iaconesi and Persico have worked side by side with the City of New Haven, Yale professors and students, The Grove New Haven and other city organizations and individuals to bring the project to life.

Our desire as humans is to interconnect,” explains Iaconesi. “Through Human Ecosystems, New Haven’s diverse communities of citizens, activists, students, professors, researchers, cultures and organizations can learn, together, how to tap into the massive amount of data available in the Digital Public Space to create awareness, shared knowledge, civic movement, beauty and communal action.

Iaconesi and Persico began collecting data in New Haven in October, and have conducted a series of intensive open workshops across the city in an effort to teach citizens, researchers, artists and students how use the project.

The possibilities are endless,” says Persico. “You can tap into Human Ecosystems and discover the emotions of an entire city. You can find out where there is joy, love, hate, anxiety, or the sense of financial or physical insecurity. You can see where certain communities and cultures gather, how and why they come together or separate and what influences them.

In learning how to use the system, individuals and groups will be able to create art, data visualizations, generate information about the city and its overlapping, ever-connecting communities, conduct research about their town (and its hopes, fears, dreams, needs and more), research complex scientific and social issues, create civic engagement and action, create new forms forms of social innovation practices and services, and discover new ways to organize citizens.

Human Ecosystems Workshop: The Grove, New Haven

Human Ecosystems Workshop: The Grove, New Haven

From December 9-12, an exhibit at New Haven City Hall will allow citizens will to interact with info-visualizations and participate in data-driven activities allowing them to explore New Haven in completely new ways. There is incredible potential, Iaconesi says, for this project to thrive in New Haven.

In partnership with the City and members of the Yale community, Persico and Iaconesi are working to find the project a permanent home in the community – a “Real Time Museum of the City,” which will feature a human data-connected “plantarium,” a learning laboratory and exhibits.

Human Ecosystems has been established in Rome, Sao Paulo, Montreal, Toronto, Cairo, Istanbul and Budapest. In the next few years it will move across the globe, generating scientific research, artworks, community projects, education projects, participatory decision-making and policy shaping tools. But first City Elm.

***

CREDITS

HENHV is an event created by:

AOS – Art is Open Source; YWF – Yale World Fellows;  The City of New Haven

In collaboration with:

YUDW – Yale Urban Design Workshop; CEID – Yale Center for Engineering, Innovation and Design; CEI – Yale Center For Emotional Intelligence; The Grove; D&I – Yale Design and Innovation Club; PII – Peace Islands Institute; ISYSA – Italian Society of Yale Students and Affiliates

Made possible by:

Yale World Fellows

Yale World Fellows

With the partnerships of:

Yale Urban Design Workshop

Yale Urban Design Workshop

Center for Engineering Innovation and Design

Center for Engineering Innovation and Design

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence

The Grove

The Grove

Design & Innovation Club at Yale School of Management

Design & Innovation Club at Yale School of Management

City of New Haven

City of New Haven

 

with the support of:

Eisenhower Fellowships

Eisenhower Fellowships

 

Links & Info

Learn more about the PROGRAM and initiatives in town: http://worldfellows.yale.edu/human-ecosystems-new-haven

Learn more about the Human Ecosystems project: http://www.human-ecosystems.com/

Learn more about Salvatore Iaconesi: http://worldfellows.yale.edu/salvatore-iaconesi

Human Ecosystems on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HumanEcosystems

Contact:

Uma Ramiah, Director of Communications, Yale World Fellows

uma.ramiah@yale.edu | +1 203-432-1916

 

Human Ecosystems: Hate in New Haven

Human Ecosystems: Hate in New Haven

 

Human Ecosystems New Haven: Poster

Human Ecosystems New Haven: Poster

Art is Open Source and Human Ecosystems at Yale: some events

Join us in Yale for a series of events during Salvatore’s Yale World Fellowship: a Master’s Tea at Saybrook College, an Inspired Series talk at the New Haven public library, a talk about Human Ecosystems at the Department of Computer Science. And more to come.

Here are some details for the three events:

The first one: on October 9th, at the New Haven Free Public Library, Ives Branch, 133 Elm Street, from 5pm to 7pm, there will be a session of the Inspired Series: stories of change with the Yale World Fellows. With Biola Alabi, Nandita Das, Salvatore Iaconesi and Parmesh Shahani.

Inspired Series at the New Haven Public Library

Inspired Series at the New Haven Public Library

 

The second one: Salvatore Iaconesi at the Master’s Tea at Saybrook College, at the Master’s House on 90 High Street, New Haven, on October 14th, from 4pm. The Master’s Tea is a wonderful informal event format, focusing on a conversation between the college Master, the guests and students, and is open to everyone, including the community outside of Yale.

 

The third one: a presentation of the Human Ecosystems project at the Department of Computer Science, on October 16th at 4pm, 51 Prospect Street, AK Watson, Room 200. We will present the Human Ecosystems project, and its first starting steps in New Haven. During the meeting, people will understand what the project is, and how they can join in, by attending one of the workshops which we will be doing in October and November, and participating with a project for the exhibit in December.

Human Ecosystems at Computer Science in Yale

Human Ecosystems at Computer Science in Yale

Images of the Human Ecosystems in Sao Paulo: the real-time museum of the city

As appeared here in Human Ecosystems: here are some images of the Real Time Museum of the city in Sao Paulo, and of the first workshop which we held there.

More information here: http://human-ecosystems.com/home/human-ecosystems-in-sao-paulo-the-real-time-museum-of-the-city/

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The photo set can be found on Flickr: Human Ecosystems on Flickr

La Cura at Data Viz or Data Touch, in Paris

Join us in Paris on October 17th 2014 for “Data Viz or Data TouchArt, Science, Design and Data Visualisation, at Google’s Cultural Institute Lab, for a performative discussion about La Cura, the Open Source Cure for Cancer.

« Data viz or Data touch ? »
Art, Science, Design & Data visualisation

Friday  October 17th 2014
17h-19h

Lab de l’Institut Culturel de Google
8, rue de Londres, Paris

A conference organised by Décalab, together with:

  • Catherine Ramus, Designer Orange Labs Orange / Albertine Meunier, Artist
  • Emmanuel Mahé, Director of Research, EnsAD Paris, Research associate Décalab
  • Annick Bureaud, Art Critic, Director Leonardo/Olats
  • David Guez, artist, Performance « mémoire numérique & conservation »
  • Salvatore Iaconesi, engineer, interaction designer, artist, hacker, Performance « La Cura »

The conference abstract, in French:

Le terme français de « données » (data en anglais) peut porter à confusion. Elles ne sont pas « données », au sens où il suffirait de les collecter. Elles sont en réalité construites. La question de leur traitement – accès, collecte, analyse – ne doit pas faire oublier que les data sont en effet fabriquées. La relation à la réalité et aux autres s’en trouve modifiée.

On limite cependant trop souvent la matérialisation des données à leur simple « visualisation », c’est-à-dire à un seul de nos sens.

Quelle réduction ! Le son et le toucher sont en effet les parents pauvres des data designers.

Cette conférence perfomative vous propose une autre esthétique informationnelle : vous écouterez et toucherez des data.

Free entry with registration at:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1jQjBNFC3heggM9EUmP_4ayJSKpQ81J6UsTfphWUyGac/viewform?edit_requested=true

La Cura, data visualisation

La Cura, data visualisation