Persona Non Data: turning a cultural institute into a data generator

“Persona Non Data”: Art in the age of Big Data

Full information at: http://artisopensource.net/persona-non-data/

Persona Non Data - Faces

Persona Non Data – Faces

An interactive installation shows how art can join research and technological innovation in the understanding of the cultural transformation in the age of Big Data, investigating on the critical implications originating from the large quantities of data which human beings generate in their daily lives.

Persona Non Data is the interactive artwork that, starting from February 4th 2016, will invade Somerset House‘s exhibit spaces, in London.

Persona Non Data

Persona Non Data

The artwork has been created by Salvatore Iaconesi and Oriana Persico, part of the Art is Open Source collective which has focused its artistic practice on the exploration of the mutations of people’s lives with the ubiquitous diffusion of digital technologies. The artwork has been produced and supported by King’s College Cultural Institute, and comes with the academic lead of Dr. Mark Coté, of the college’s Digital Humanities department.

In Persona Non Data Somerset House itself will be transformed into a large-scale data generator, collecting any form of digital information which is generated by its visitors: their faces and movements as they are captured by CCTV cameras; the ways in which they use the wifi connection; their social networking activities.

Persona Non Data - a building becomes a data generator

Persona Non Data – a building becomes a data generator

All the data is represented through infoaesthetic visualisations, bringing together information design, complex systems and art.

An artwork of this kind exposes the critical issues of the information era: privacy, invasive technologies, opportunities coming from Open Data, surveillance, the mutation of our habits and behaviours, the transformation of labour, research and education with the advent of BigData, Artificial Intelligence and the emergence of power architectures represented by algorithms.

Persona Non Data - the data working class

Persona Non Data – the data working class

If, on the one hand, the abundance of data and algorithmic intelligence brings forth the possibility for radical innovation for our security, environment, energy and research, on the other hand we see our lives become more controlled, observed and encoded. On top of that, whether we realise it or not, we are transformed into unknowing data generators, as all of our ordinary activities start to generate digital data.

This is one of the themes which the artwork deals with. Among the visualisations in the exhibit a three-dimensional head “wears” the faces of the visitors of the exhibit, which are harvested using facial recognition algorithms, and, thus, they are virtually “employed” in the exhibit itself, for free, without realising it, through their data, just as all of us have become unknowing free labourers of the data industry, in each of our daily activities.

This and other critical issues will be explored in the cultural program which comes with “Persona Non Data”, through seminars, workshops and roundtables.

More information, including dates, events and cultural program at: http://artisopensource.net/persona-non-data/

Persona Non Data

Persona Non Data

 

Ghost Writer. A new literary genre: the algorithmic autobiography. Launch at StreamingEgos

GhostWriter is a new project by Art is Open Source.

A new literary genre to explore the mutation of the narration of self: the algorithmic autobiography.

Launched for the Streaming Egos project with the Goethe Institut and with the curation of the Italian group by Marco Mancuso and Filippo Lorenzin, the overall project includes 5 countries (Belgium, Germany, France, Italy, Portugal and Spain). The launch event will be in Düsseldorf on January 16th and 17th 2016, at the NRW-Forum. In the Italian group we have the pleasure of being with Silvio Lorusso, Alterazioni Video, IOCose.

 

Ghost Writer

Ghost Writer is the first publication of a new literary genre: the algorithmic autobiography.

We are never alone when we construct our autobiography: other people are always with us, with their presence, influences, relations, interactions, shaping not only our behaviours, but also what we remember, what we feel as relevant, important, worthwhile, and also changing the ways in which we express it, for whom, and the contracts we establish by expressing ourselves: what to show, what to hide, how to interpret it, how to give a form to it.

As human beings of our times, new subjects enter the scene. We constantly leave digital traces in our lives, whether we realize it or not, whether we want it or not. A number of subjects constantly keep track of these bits of ourselves, constructing multiple versions of narrations of our lives, each with different focuses, parameters, points of view, perspectives. These are, to all effects, biographies.

Even more, they are auto-biographies. Auto, because they are automatically collected. And Auto, because we produce and express these bits of memory ourselves, in our daily lives, through our ordinary performances, like entries in an ubiquitous diary.

If we can collect all of these bits, all these episodes, all of these digital traces in our ubiquitous diary, we can imagine to produce a novel form of autobiography. Currently, multiple algorithms do exactly this, collecting all of these bits about ourselves, classifying them, organizing them by time, topic, emotion, behaviour, patterns, types, focuses and more.

These algorithms are the Ghost Writers of our Autobiographies.

Thus comes GhostWriter, a new literary genre: the algorithmic autobiography.

GhostWriter

GhostWriter

More information about Ghost Writer will be coming soon, right after the opening of the exhibit.

In the meantime, here are the short articles which we published on the Streaming Egos Blog:

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at the STARTS program in Brussels

I think that more and more we all understand that innovation in the future will be on the intersection of arts and sciences. (video)
— Commissioner Carlos Moedas

Artistic creativity and critical thinking are essential for innovation in today’s digital world.  Already, highly innovative companies like Mercedes thrive on a strong link between artists and their engineers…The EU will support [such] multidisciplinary themes in H2020…
— Commissioner Günther Oettinger

On December 1st and 2nd 2015,  at the European Parliament and Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium for Science and the Arts, in Brussels, Belgium, Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons will take part “Innovation at the intersection of Arts, Sciences and Technology” event, organized by the STARTS program.

We will present the Human Ecosystems and the Ubiquitous Commons cases as the opportunity for creating value and inclusiveradical innovation through the collaboration between sciences, technologies and the arts, creating impacts for society, administrations and businesses.

From the website of the event:

Today, it is recognised that the critical skills needed for innovation to happen and to be of value for society are – in addition to scientific and technological skills –skills such as creativity and capacity to involve all of society in the process of (open) innovation. In this context, the Arts are gaining prominence as a catalyst for an efficient conversion of S&T knowledge into novel products, services, and processes and as a catalyst of open approaches in society, research, and business.

This event will focus on innovation through crossovers from culture, in particular artistic practices, to innovation in technology, society, business and regional development. It will cover policy aspects as well as successful examples of crossovers from culture to industry and regional development. Artists will also contribute with their views.

The meeting is organised on invitation by Members of European Parliament from the Committees on Culture and Education (CULT) and Industry, Research and Energy (ITRE). The event will link directly regionally-embedded actors across Europe from private and public sectors.

More information here, including Program and location.

Watch out for updates on this website for the results of the event, and about our next initiatives.

UPDATE: here is the slideshow from our presentation

Hacking Melanoma

Join us in Capri from October 20th to November 1st for Hacking Melanoma!

Hacking Melanoma will be a hackathon dedicated to the technological, social and relational aspects of e-health, and explicitly dedicated to the diagnosis and cure of Melanoma, skin cancer, one of the most frequent forms of cancer, but, also, a form of cancer which, if diagnosed in its early stages, can be cured with 100% success. This is why having the availability of early diagnosis solutions is of such vital importance.

During the hackathon, we will spend 3 days immersed in a deep brainstorming session: people with different skills, expertise, experiences and passions will interact to unveil innovative ideas.

3 thematic tables will be present: Medicine, Development and Communication. Each table will have its brief (linked above) to start thinking and acting.

A jury composed by Alex Giordano, Giovanni De Caro, Marco Mistretta, Salvatore Iaconesi, Oriana Persico and Arturo Di Corinto will participate to the evaluations of the ideas which will come as a result of the brief.

This is the link to the programhttp://www.i3-dermoscopy.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/programma.pdf

These are some Frequently Asked Questionshttp://www.i3-dermoscopy.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/FAQ.pdf

Look here to understand who is involved and which are the partners of the initiative: http://www.i3-dermoscopy.it/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/comunicato-stampa.pdf

Come to:

Centro Multimediale “Mario Cacace”

via G. Orlandi 100, Anacapri, Naples

Petterns of Commoning is out

The book “Patterns of Commoning” edited by David Bollier and Silke Helfrich is out.

From the book’s website:

In Patterns of Commoning, more than sixty frontline activists, academics and project leaders from twenty countries explain how commoning is empowering people to challenge the deep pathologies of contemporary capitalism and invent powerful, participatory alternatives.

Among all of the contributions, it contains our chapter on the Digital Commons.

Cite as:

Iaconesi S. (2015) “Digital Arts as Commons” in “Patterns of Commoning” Bollier D. (ed.), Helfrich S. (ed). Commons Strategies Group.