Ubiquitous Infoscapes at UNIDEE

Last days to join in for Ubiquitous Infoscape, our immersive workshop at UNIDEE, from  May 4th to May 8th 2015, at Città dell’Arte, in Biella, Italy.

During the workshop we will confront with the Ubiquitous Infoscape, the immersive and pervasive information landscape in which we have learned, as human beings, to use and interact with, in every manifestation of our daily lives.

You can register HERE, using this link.

Here is the abstract of the workshop:

Data and information are everywhere.

 

In our times, we constantly and ubiquitously generate data and information. The masses of data and information generated by others (people, objects, organizations and algorithms) radically transform our daily lives, the ways in which we work, relate to each other, express emotions, experience places and spaces, consume, do things together.

 

Seamlessly augmented with information, the physical landscape becomes infoscape (a landscape of information).

 

The module Ubiquitous Infoscapes combines experiential, theoretical, practice and performance based phases, each continuously flowing into the other.

 

The experiential sessions, aimed at expanding knowledge and imaginaries, will develop around case studies to unveil the many facets of the Ubiquitous Infoscape, how it radically transforms both our lives and our perception of the world, affecting public, private and intimate spaces, our rights, and our approach to knowledge-sharing, learning, expression and communication. Examples will be drawn from a wide spectrum of international practitioners, including artists, designers, hackers, architects and researchers, with a more in-depth focus on AOS and Human Ecosystems.

 

The theoretical sessions aim at broadening the understanding of the subject through discussing those issues (social, political, aesthetic, psychological, cognitive, anthropological) highlighted within the experiential sessions. We will explore the production of a number of theoreticians, researchers, writers and other influential figures, trying to discern the narrative(s) of the mutation of human beings in the age of ubiquitous information.

 

The practice and performance sessions aim at constructing a small – yet meaningful – artistic and creative production inspired by those instances discussed within the previous phases and highlighting one or more elements of the human mutation brought by the continuous emergence of Ubiquitous Infoscapes. In this phase we will create, and express ourselves, through texts, images, software, installation, movement, gestures and curious rituals.

 

Previous technical knowledge is not required. The artists will provide extensive support (even for writing small pieces of software) across all activities, ensuring active participation of all throughout all sessions. At the end of each day, an “ubiquitous ritual” will allow all participants to express themselves in meaningful ways.

These, below is the schedule for the activities of the workshop:

May 4th

 

  • morning
    • Guided tour to Cittadellarte, including the Pistoletto, Arte Povera collections and temporary exhibitions (curated by Luca Furlan)
    • Group presentations
    • Methodologies and technical set-up
  • afternoon
    • The artists present themselves and their philosophy
    • Experience Session I (examples and interactive experiences, discussion)
    • Ubiquitous Ritual I

May 5th

  • morning
    • Experience Session II (examples and interactive experiences, discussion)
    • Theoretical Session I (short readings, screenings and discussing theoretical approaches)
  • afternoon
    • Theoretical Session II (short readings, screenings and discussing theoretical approaches)
    • Practice & Performance Phase I (brainstorming to define the concept of the production, and its iterative redefinition)
    • Ubiquitous Ritual II

May 6th

  • morning
    • Theoretical Session III (short readings, screenings and discussing theoretical approaches)
    • Practice & Performance Session II (introduction to the tools we will use for the creation of the artistic production, and set-up of the projects)
  • afternoon
    • Practice & Performance Session III (project development and collaboration)
    • Ubiquitous Ritual III

May 7th

  • morning
    • Documentation (all participants work on assembling the documentation so far)
    • Practice & Performance Session IV (project development and collaboration)
  • afternoon
    • Practice & Performance Session V (project development and collaboration)
    • Ubiquitous Ritual IV

May 8th

  • morning
    • Documentation (gathering of all the materials generated in the last P&P sessions for
    • inclusion in the documentation, including video, software, images, concepts etc.)
    • Presentation
  • afternoon
    • Performance Ubiquitous Ritual with all the guests coming to the presentation

 

Here are some readings which may be helpful:

The Third Infoscape:

http://www.artisopensource.net/network/artisopensource/2013/11/20/third-infoscape-de-certeau-clement-casagrande-smart-cities/

P2P Ethnography:

http://www.artisopensource.net/network/artisopensource/2014/07/30/communication-knowledge-and-information-in-the-human-ecosystem-p2p-ethnography/

Cultures, communities, roles and emergence:

http://human-ecosystems.com/home/relations-in-the-human-ecosystems-cultures-communities-roles-and-emergence/

Transmedia Design:

http://www.artisopensource.net/network/artisopensource/2014/04/30/transmedia-design/

Anthropological Innovation: 

http://www.artisopensource.net/network/artisopensource/2013/07/28/anthropological-innovation-observing-and-understanding-the-mutation-of-human-life/

Ubiquitous Commons at Nexa Center for Internet & Society

Join us at Nexa Center for Internet & Society, on Wednesday April 8th 2015 from 6pm to 8pm, for an open discussion about and around the concept of the Ubiquitous Commons, the international research effort which is bringing about the development of a legal and technological toolkit through which people and organizations will be able to re-establish the power balance in deciding how their information is used.

The event will take place at Nexa, in Via Boggio 65/a, Turin (first floor).

There will be a live webcast of the event, HERE.

Learn more about the event HERE, by clicking on this link.

In occasion of the 74th Nexa Wednesday, a recurring event which each week brings together practitioners, theorists, researchers and academics to discuss important issues regarding technologies, society and the law, on April 8th, we will discuss the Ubiquitous Commons together with Salvatore Iaconesi, the research coordinator of the project, and Ugo Pagallo,  Professor at the University of Turin, Faculty Fellow at Nexa and who got interested in the project since its creation.

You can learn more about the Ubiquitous Commons HERE.

To keep up with the news about Ubiquitous Commons, follow this page: http://www.ubiquitouscommons.org/updates/

 

The Nexa Center for Internet & Society is born from the activities of an initially informal interdisciplinary group – with expertise in technology, law and economics – that grew up in Torino from 2003 and that has conceived, designed and implemented a number of initiatives: Creative Commons Italia (2003-present),CyberLaw Torino (2004), Harvard Internet Law Program Torino (2005), SeLiLi, free legal advice on open licenses for creators and programmers (2006-present), COMMUNIA, the European Commission-funded thematic network of 50 partners aimed at studying the digital public domain (2007-2011), Neubot, a software project on network neutrality (2008-present), and LAPSI, the European thematic network on legal aspects of public sector information funded by the European Commission (2010-2012).

Multipli-cities: a festival in Rome, poliphonic visions on the city, Human Ecosystems

Join us on February 28-28 2015 in Rome,at the Ex Cartiera Latina ( in beautiful industrial complex deep in the Appia Antica Regional Park, in Via Appia Antica, 42) for the 2NC Fest, Multipli-Cities, a biennial event on urban multimedia narratives, offering a focus on cities and on the opportunities which open up when the city is imagined as a polyphony of voices and expressions. There, we will showcase the most recent updates of Human Ecosystems in Rome.

The festival is organised by Visiva and Naked City Project and will offer a complex setup of conferences, installations, screening and live performances focused on the city, and its multiple points of view.

You can find the full program here.

We will be present with HERO (Human Ecosystems Rome), and in a couple of talks and other sessions.

Human Ecosystems: Digital Urban Acupuncture in Journal of Community Informatics

The article “Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media” has just been published on Journal of Community Informatics, Vol 10, No 3 (2014), Special Issue: Community Informatics and Urban Planning.

This is the abstract for the paper, presented in the Notes from the Field section:

Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media

The concept of Urban Acupuncture as applied to a contemporary vision of cities, between ubiquitous technologies, social networks, sensors and cloud computing. From the possibility to listen in real time to the digital life of the city to the opportunity to design and implement novel models for participatory, co-creation practices for city governance, planning, culture, tourism, citizen activation.

The paper describes the construction process of a methodology and of the required set of digital tools which allow to enact Urban Acupuncture practices in cities with high numbers of social media interactions

Two case studies are included for the City of Rome and the City of Turin, showing two practical applications in the domains of culture and of multiculturalism, respectively.

The two cases have been performed in collaboration and with the support of the city administrations and, in the final remarks, they are used to produce an evaluation of the proposed methodology and a series of focuses for further research and investigation.

 

You can access the article here: Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media

Cite as:

Iaconesi, Salvatore, and Oriana Persico. “Urban Acupuncture in the Era of Ubiquitous Media.” Journal of Community Informatics 10, no. 3 (2014). http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/issue/view/49.
news from Human Ecosystems

10 Minutes in Detroit

An information visualisation built using the Human Ecosystems will be featured at the Gallery Project, in Detroit, for the Unseen exhibit.

10 Minutes in Detroit captures all the social networking activity in the city of Detroit on June 30th 2014 and visualises it in a series of different ways, using the Human Ecosystems ( http://human-ecosystems.com/home/ ).

The exhibit will be in Detroit from August 1st to August 31st, 2014 (Eastern Market, 1550 Winder, across from Red Bull House of Art, Detroit, MI) and in Ann Arbor from September 12th to October 12th, 2014 (Ann Arbor Art Center, Ann Arbor, MI).

Unseen is curated by Rocco DePietro and Gloria Pritschet

The quest to see lies at the heart of human urgency. To breach the barrier between the visible and the invisible is compelling, emotional, informative and even magical. This process of discovery has always driven thinkers and image makers: artists, scientists and philosophers, from astronomers to nanotechnologists, from documentarians and data analysts to planners and prognosticators. As the unseen becomes seeable and seen, a pivot occurs, revealing and demanding irreversible change. No one who has seen is ever the same.

The invisible may be unseen for many reasons. It may be purposely covert for socio-political or military reasons, or to hide corruption or actions contrary to the public good. It may be inadvertently unseen because of the limits of technology or its applications, or the limits of human perception or comprehension. It may be willfully unseen from lack of curiosity, imagination, salience, awareness, or limitations of perceptual processes.

Many contemporary artists and scientists are dedicated to expressing the unseen and to making the invisible visible. They may be motivated to advance their disciplines, or may be fascinated by the prospect of discovery, or the challenge and adventure of harnessing emerging technologies to express ideas. They may believe it is important to uncover secrets, to disclose purposely hidden information, some of which strikes at the heart of democracy, personal privacy, individual well-being, individual freedom, the public’s right to know, and the health and survival of planet Earth. They may seek to awaken consciousness to initiate conversation about outcomes, implications and possibilities.

This exhibition invites the participants to visualize and express the unseen, and to comment on the impacts of the transformed vista.

In Unseen, participants’ work may express a range of conceptual dimensions. For example, they may be disclosing the purposely hidden or the inadvertently unseen. They may seek out significant and impactful information or simply delight in the creative, visually beautiful or surprising. Participants’ work may also express a range of thresholds of visibility. For example, they may be exploring micro, meso or macro levels of invisibility, from microbial and sub-atomic worlds to social, global and universal phenomena. Several examples follow:

The Hubble and Kepler telescopes are discovering evidence of earthlike and superhabitable planets, whose conditions for sustain carbon-based life surpass those of earth. However much of space is unseen by us, for intentional covert reasons or because we lack the means to perceive it.

In his book Dark Skies, Trevor Paglen, uses time-lapse photography with super sensitive equipment to capture images of military spy satellites streaking across the night sky. Photographed over a landscape reminiscent of Ansel Adams, the images are chilling reminder of what’s up there unseen.

Remote sensors and sonar probe deep within the earth and below the ocean floor in places like the arctic (where over 90% of Russia’s natural gas is located) mapping caches of gold, uranium, and rare earth minerals. Private corporations often own the proprietary maps. These same technologies offer crucial information to science, for example, in marine and desert archeology and research.

Environmental pollution related to deep earth mineral and gas extraction, and droughts; ancient aquifers are drained, the land debased, the water supply is poisoned and behind the guise of efficiency and technological advances.

Study of long term-data for natural cycles and systems reveals climate patterns, meteoric and volcanic activity, intense solar storms, and models their relationship to human activity and potential catastrophic impacts.

Disadvantaged individuals and groups that are invisible due to personal attitudes, social policy, and a history of neglect, e.g., the elderly and incarcerated black youth.

Architects and artists are working to reinterpret space in cities. Art is Open Source depicts the layers formed by people who uniquely shape the space through their use of mobile devices, ubiquitous technologies, and social networks.

Data art amasses complex critical information and presents it visually appealing and easily readable formats. Josh Begley, the originator of Dronestream, which documents the increase in drone strikes in the past decade, has created a new Apple App, Metadata, which documents drone strikes in real time.

Genetic research and engineering have enabled modification and selection of traits in foods, opening broad argument about health, safety, the power of chemical companies, and international meddling.

The Human Genome Project has sequenced the chemical base pairs of human DNA, making possible cloning technologies and genetic choice (babies by design). Private companies offer genetic tests for illness predisposition. This new era in genetics opens reconsideration of human identity, illness and morality.

Google Earth Outreach is mapping indigenous people around the world. The project protects 600,000 acres of the Surui of Brazil from exploitation, illegal mining and logging Photographer Martin Schoeller, with National Geographic, is bringing the issues facing lost tribes to global attention. Impact of such projects on their way of life is uncertain.

Animal research has revealed highly differentiated sounds and as yet untranslated complex language among elephants, dolphins, and other mammals. Increased understanding of animal language, emotion and culture challenges narrow preconceptions of animals as lesser beings, as food or objects for our entertainment.

American intelligence gathering is largely covert and secret. Edward Snowden, in revealing the extent of information collected about ordinary citizens, awakened awareness and initiated a change in generally held assumptions.

Cyber warfare, increasing in sophistication and run by rogue and government sanctioned hackers, challenges the security of nuclear facilities, financial systems, and personal data. There are no visual maps for understanding cybercrime.

Secret drone strikes in Yemen or Pakistan are supported by networks of underwater fiber optic cables, military satellites and command centers, remote sensing and vision systems, and superfast computers. Congress’ decision to continue their control in the CIA, rather than to transfer it to the Defense Department insures that they remain secret.

HAARP (The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) is an ionospheric research program jointly funded by the Defense Department and private contractors. HAARP analyzes the ionosphere and investigates the potential for developing ionospheric enhancement technology for radio communications and surveillance. Some say one of its goals is to transmit electricity wirelessly. Based in Gakona, Alaska, some experts say that HAARP is capable of modifying weather, disabling satellites, causing air crashes, earthquakes, droughts, storms, floods, and even disease.

There is a whole category of contemporary art this is full of technical and creative surprises. These works might involve hidden images, inference of the presence of the objects and content when they are not there, and movement that alters the visual and perceptual field. Some can only be fully realized with the participation and imagination of the viewer.