HE and UC at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon 20-22 October

ICT2015 – Innovate, Connect, Transform  is the largest event organized by the EU Commission in 2015 to foster research and innovation at European level, show the best results achieved through financed projects, inform about upcoming call, facilitate the emergence of new networks.

The StARTS program – Innovation at the nexus of Science, Technology and the Arts, realized for the occasion an exhibit showcasing a selection of different projects from allover Europe: Italy was represented by Ubiquitous Commons and Human Ecosystems, in particular the ongoing HUB – Human Ecosystems Bologna project.

The program “attempts to bring the creative power of the Arts to bear on innovation in Europe by including artists in European Commission funded research“, as explains Ralph Dum (European Commission) in a recent article.

From our experience, StARTS created an unexpected short circuit of languages in the standard setting of EU events, showing how research can become performance, data the access to perceive new possible realities, and more. A place in which was a pleasure to live and interact for three days.

Below some pictures from the exhibit.

Special thanks to Luis Girao, Irene Ingardi and the whole crew of StARTS for making it possible.

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit - ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems and Ubiquitous Commons at StARTS exhibit – ICT2015, Lisbon, 20-22 October

Human Ecosystems at Expo Aquae, in Venice

Human Ecosystems at Expo Aquae in Venice, August 1st 2015, at 11am.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0yroTq4Jd0]

Full information about the event is on Human Ecosystems.

How do we speak about water?

How do we relate? What are our fears, concerns, important issues, joys and anxieties about water?

We have captured 3 months of public social networking conversations about water, and analysed them: a full linguistic, emotional, geographical, relational and network analysis has been performed on them, using Human Ecosystems technologies.

More than 700 thousand conversations, involving more than 150 thousand users speaking Italian or being in the Italian territory.

From people going to the beach, to concerns about pollution, draughts, the extreme heath and other expressions, among surprise, joy, happiness, and anxiety, fear, expectation.

All of the data will be published as an Open Data dataset, to be used by citizens, researchers and organizations to understand our expressions about water and the ways in which we collaborate, are different, are united or divided, and how emotions, opinions, information and knowledge spread across human relations in the digital sphere.

Join us in Venice on August 1st for the presentation.

Human Ecosystems , Water, in Venice

Human Ecosystems , Water, in Venice

This initiative is organized and supported by:

http://only-italia.it/

http://www.diculther.eu/

http://www.baicr.it/

http://www.4changing.it/

http://www.insor.eu/

Download the official Press Release (Italian)

3 days in London with Human Ecosystems, La Cura and Ubiquitous Commons: report

From June 3rd to Jun 5th, a series of events organized by the Big Social Data Research Group at King’s College in collaboration with Citizen Biomedicin Research Group and the Open Data Institute,  engaged AOS in a workshop, a lecture and a public talk.

Below a report from the three events.

1. June 3rd: “Playing with data in the Ubiquitous Commons” – workshop

A one-day hands-on workshop hosted by the Big Social Data Research Group at King’s College.

Human Ecosystems Workshop - King's College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop – King’s College, London

During the morning session we introduced and explored with participants a series of  key concepts, in particular:

  • the conceptual frame of the Human Ecosystems project, describing how multiple types of public data coming from social networks, sensors, open data sources, energy use, census and more can be captured, processed using multiple techniques (from Natural Language Processing, to Machine Learning, Network Analysis, Emotional Analysis and Geographic Analysis) to produce a set of large Data Commons, which can be used for multiple purposes including research, policy making, citizen action, collaboration, participatory and peer-to-peer organizational models, development of novel forms of economies, creation of services, artworks, designs, information visualizations, interactive experiences, digital toys, data-reactive devices and more;
  • the concept of the Relational Ecosystem, describing how these massive data capturing techniques can lead to forming large linked data patterns which, in turn, lead to the possibility to understand how communities form and transform over time and place, by understanding information, knowledge, opinion, emotion and behavior flows in cities. We also focused on the many characteristics of these human networks and of their participants, including their characterization as influencers, experts, hubs, bridges among different communities, and the ways in which to create new characterizations, using network science;
  • the many implications of these practices, at levels which are social, political, economic, exploring the resulting modifications of the factual and perceived concepts of public, private and intimate spheres, and the further transformations to citizens’ awareness and action which could be brought on by the availability of such a large Data Commons, and of the tools to use it, of the related education processes, of the information visualizations and on the participatory practices which could develop.
Human Ecosystems Workshop - King's College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop – King’s College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop - King's College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop – King’s College, London

During the afternoon session:

  • a series of tools from the Human Ecosystems platform was installed, giving participants the possibility to autonomously start their own data harvesting processes;
  • a complete social network harvesting process for the city of London was started. The group watched the results using a variety of information visualizations which are present in the current HE toolkits (geographic, relational, networked, time-based, artistic, and more). We explored the principal steps which are required to create new ones (the structure of the data sources in the commons produced through Human Ecosystems, the many tools, libraries and Human Ecosystems API calls which can be used for this purpose).
  • we finally focused on some of the participants’ projects and activities to suggest ways in which the Human Ecosystems could be used in their cases, also establishing a number of possible partnerships and opportunities which need to be explored further.
Human Ecosystems Workshop - King's College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop – King’s College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop - King's College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop – King’s College, London

Human Ecosystems Workshop, King's College: capturing London

Human Ecosystems Workshop, King’s College: capturing London

2. June 4th: “La Cura, an Open Source Cure for Cancer” – lecture and conversation

A 2 hours lecture hosted by the Citizen Biomedicine Research Group which involved us and the participant in deep and stimulating conversation exploring:

  • The unfolding of the facts and implications of “La Cura”, from the events which led to its beginning, its artistic elements, the metaphors of data as a connecting tissue for society, the biopolitical aspects of data and Big Data, the social interaction, collaboration and participation aspects of La Cura, the media and communication aspects of the project;
  • The rituals of hacking (understanding systems, generating knowledge, making knowledge available, provoke unexpected usages) and their implications on medicine;
  • The rituals of re-appropriation of data, an the consequent transition from data-subject to the holistic interpretation of human being, in which data becomes an opportunity for interconnection, interaction and participation of the entire society;
  • The role of arts, design, creativity and transgression, as radical innovators, as creators of new, unexpected spaces for social construction of conscience, as multipliers of perceived possible futures, and as tools to explore desirable, preferrable futures;
  • The comparison of “La Cura” to other experiences (like, for example, cancer bloggers, cancer and social networks) and services (like “Patients Like Me”).
La Cura: lecture at King's College Citizens  Biomedicine Research Group

La Cura: lecture at King’s College Citizens Biomedicine Research Group

Among the results, the conversation collaboratively described a tentative scenario in which experiences like “La Cura” and more encoded, industrialized ones like “Patients Like Me” could come together and co-exist according to an ecosystemic approach to suggest new scenarios for the collaborative and participative production of science, social and political actions, economies, activism, and peer-to-peer operative models.

3. 5th June: “Ubiquitous Commons” – public talk

Hosted by the ODI – Open Data Institute, the talk involved a very diverse audience, including hackers, lawyers, organizations, enterprises, developers, architects, urban planners, Internet of Things enthusiasts and experts.

Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI - Open Data Institute (London)

Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI – Open Data Institute (London)

During the discussion we:

  • Explored the scenario leading to the creation of the Ubiquitous Commons: conscious/unconscious ubiquitousproduction of data; impossibility to understand what data we generate, and how it is used; impossibility to express ho we want our data to be used; impossibility to track how our data is used; impossibility to autonomously or collaboratively enact individual or participatory practices for data generation and usage, in inclusive ways;
  • Explored the Ubiquitous Commons architecture: externalize data access mechanism from operators (social networks, IoT, domotics, biotech, wearables…) onto a peer-to-peer environment (Blockchain), using encryption and a legal/technological protocol;
  • Explored the possibility to create data commons using the Ubiquitous Commons identity model (individual, collective, anonymous, nomadic and temporary types of identity);
  • Explored the legal, political, social, economic, creative implications of the model.
  • Discussed possible usage scenarios and novel economic models.
  • Discussed technical/technological implications;
  • Expressed a call to action for interested parties to join the initiative (legal, technical/technological, use cases, adoption communties).
Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI - Open Data Institute (London)

Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI – Open Data Institute (London)

Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI - Open Data Institute (London)

Ubiquitous Commons talk at ODI – Open Data Institute (London)

Special thanks to Mark Coté, Tobias Blanke, Barbara Prainsack, Lorenzo Del Savio, Jennifer, Giles Greenway for the wonderful hospitality and to make all of it happen. 

Ubiquitous Commons on Financial Times

On May 20th, thanks to Maija Palmer, an interesting article on Ubiquitous Commons entitled “Conflict over data ownership lies ahead” was published on Financial Times.

The article is available at this link:

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/2f8290b2-cc8f-11e4-b5a5-00144feab7de.html#axzz3bKEpEIEf

You can download a pdf version here.

[…] “But could a system be created that gave back some control to individuals? An international group of researchers led by Salvatore Iaconesi, a lecturer at the La Sapienza university in Rome, and Oriana Persico, a communication scientist, is trying to create a legal and technical toolkit that would allow people to do just that.

The concept, called Ubiquitous Commons (UC), would insert a layer between individuals and Facebook that specifies how a users’ details can be used. For example, when a user types an “I love kittens” post on Facebook and presses “send” the message would be intercepted by the UC platform and encrypted before it reaches Facebook. They would be asked to specify how their data might be used — perhaps for scientific purposes, but not commercial ones, for example.

The back end of the system would log the user’s instructions to a “blockchain” or electronic public ledger. The data could only be decrypted and accessed by organisations that fit the set criteria.

 

“There is a real inequality of power between individuals and companies when it comes to data,” says Mr Iaconesi. “When you configure your privacy policy on Facebook, not many people realise that you are configuring your privacy policy towards other people, not towards Facebook. They can see it all.

 

“UC would apply not just to social networks such as Facebook, but the whole internet of things — smart fridges and [activity monitoring devices].”

People would also be able to place controls over the personal physiological data that wearable devices might generate. You could allow your health data to be seen by a doctor, for example, but not by an employer or insurance company. If it were adopted, UC would change fundamentally the balance of power of data between consumers and companies.

 

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Last month the Ubiquitous Commons group was showing the technology to Italian farmers, who have become concerned that collection of crop data is being monopolised by large food groups such as Monsanto.

Previous attempts to create social media platforms that put users in control of their data have not taken off. The Diaspora project, created in 2009 as a Facebook alternative that put individuals in control of their information, and Ello, a social network set up in 2014 with a promise never to sell users’ data to advertisers or other third parties, have not gained ground against Facebook.

Mr Iaconesi says UC is not positioning itself as an ideological choice or anti-business. Its supporters are trying to gain wider backing for their project and EU officials have already been shown the technology as part of an awareness-raising campaign.

 

Mr Iaconesi says that Facebook has seemed to be open-minded about UC so far. “On a very low and informal level, we know a lot of their developers are interested in the project,” he says.”

 

 

 

Stakhanov: the BigData Oracle for a new era

From Wikipedia:

“In Classical Antiquity, an oracle was a person or agency considered to interface wise counsel or prophetic predictions or precognition of the future, inspired by the gods.
The word oracle comes from the Latin verb ōrāre “to speak” and properly refers to the priest or priestess uttering the prediction. In extended use, oracle may also refer to the site of the oracle, and to the oracular utterances themselves, called khrēsmoi (χρησμοί) in Greek.
Oracles were thought to be portals through which the gods spoke directly to people.”
Stakhanov bigdata oracle

Stakhanov: our new religion?

Stakhanov is the BigData Oracle of the new era.
In the era of Data, Information and Knowledge, Stakhanov is the expression of our new global data-religion.
Stakhanov continuously harvests social networks for information and data, making connections, assumptions, correlations, using them to predict the future.
Line-by-line, it emits its verdicts about what will be and that which won’t.
 
Millions of people agree on the probability of a certain event? Fine, Stakhanov agrees, too, and it predicts it as a certain future.
 
You went running on the last three tuesdays, as documented by neat little maps published on Facebook? Well, Stakhanov predicts that you shall happily jog next tuesday, too: the gods-of-data say so.
 
This is the Word, coming from the Data-Above, in The Cloud.
 
A playful neo-religious data-invasion of privacy, false-hopes and the ingenuity in contemporary determinism.
Join us at the transmediale festival in Berlin from Jan. 28th to Feb. 1st, in Berlin, at the HKW to experience Stakhanov and a workshop on the Ubiquitous Commons, exploring the opportunities and dangers coming from the wide availability of ubiquitous data coming from our lives, relations, bodies and activities, and he ways in which we can turn this scenario to our advantage, as individuals and as a society.
Read more on the transmediale website:

 

NOTE: More detailed explanations about the concept, process and working details (including source code and data-sets) for Stakhanov will be published on Art is Open Source during the festival.