One Million Dreams

Dreaming on social networks.

One Million Dreams is a generative video that lasts around 200 hours which shows, instant by instant, a whole year of dreams captured from social networks.

This is a short preview.

You had a dream last night, and you published something about it on major social networks? A software captured it and put it on a database.

In the video, dreams are captured and processed using natural language analysis to understand people’s emotions regarding the various dreams, and the topic it deals with.

For the time being, we have isolated a limited number of topics: “job”, “love”, “school”, “money”, “environment”, “relations”, “family”, “memories” and “future”.

The video will be soon implemented as an exhibit, in which dreams will be captured and visualized in real-time.

One Million Dreams Exhibit

One Million Dreams Exhibit

Then they will be archived, to obtain the largest dream archive of the planet: a global library of the dreams of all humanity in which it will be possible to contribute, search for dreams and extract them (the archive of real-time dreams will form a source of real-time Open Data) and research, play, make apps with them.

One Million Dreams has been produced through the Human Ecosystems project.

Incautious Porn at SSN2014 in Barcelona

We’ll be attending SSN2014 (the 6th Biannual Surveillance and Society Conference) in Barcelona to present the outcomes of our Incautious Porn project: an anthropological experiment in blackmail and the perception of private/public space online.

From the conference site:

Contemporary surveillance is characterised by ambiguities and asymmetries. Surveillance results from different desires and rationales: control, governance, security, profit, efficiency but also care, empowerment, resistance and play. Surveillance is never neutral. Surveillance is always about power and that power is increasingly asymmetric. Surveillance practices are also changing and as ‘smart’ surveillance systems proliferate utilising and generating ‘Big Data’ new forms of ambiguity and asymmetry arise.

We will be presenting the Incautious Porn project:

Incautious Porn, an anthropological experiment in blackmail and the perception of private/public space online

 

“We have radically changed our perception of what is public and what is private.

 

While using social networks, search engines and websites determining who has access to our information, our personal details, our habits and preferences is often complex or not easily accessible.

 

Each person‘s information is sold hundreds of times each day, while surfing websites and social media sites, with information passing from one provider to the other in ways that are subtle and non-transparent: data collected on one site may be used on other sited to sell us advertisements or to investigate on our lives.

 

On top of that, most people tend to interpret social media sites as new forms of public spaces, and it is fundamental for service providers‘ strategies that this perception is maintained, to promote our full disclosure, allowing them to collect even more data about ourselves.

 

We used the project Incautious Porn to investigate on this scenario, to explore the shifting and blurring of the boundaries of what we perceive as our privacy and as our private and public spaces.

 

Incautious Porn uses the operations of a fake company systematically invading our privacy (even to the point of performing simulated forms of blackmail) to collect enormous amounts of information which we have used to analyze this scenario.

 

In Incautious Porn art acts both as a sensor on the transformation of human societies and as a tool for analyzing its effects.

 

The effects of the Incautious Porn project and communication campaign have been massive, bringing it to the attention of a large, global, audience and, thus, allowing the research team to benefit from a large data set.

 

Furthermore, the actions of the blackmailing fake-company have been led using an ethical approach: no money was taken from people, and all their personal data has been preserved, also using the initiative as a testing lab for novel privacy and security preservation techniques, and as a campaign for awareness about the transformation of people‘s perception of contemporary private/public spaces.”

On: 25th April 2014, at SSN2014, at the CCCB, street Montalegre 5

Incautious Porn: a voyage into privacy

Incautious Porn

Incautious Porn

We searched for Porn.
We found you.

We captured more than 100,000 public comments on porn and sexually oriented websites in which users left their mobile phone number to male/female/transgender performers, where everyone could see it, and we turned them into a series of paintings which you can purchase.”

Incautious Porn

We access social networking websites every day.

We think they’re free, but what we really are doing is accessing services which we pay by granting access to our personal data to companies, organizations, institutions, aggregators, marketing firms etcetera.

And there’s more.

While we navigate these websites we tend to radically transform our perception of what is public and what is private.

We often engage messaging, chats, comments and content production without realizing that we’re saying and posting things in public, where anyone can see them, and use them.

Incautious Porn is about this.

It is about the transformation of the ways in which we perceive private and public spaces.

It is about being sold hundreds of times each day: our data, information, emotions, relations.

How is it done?

We harvested the content found on hundreds of thousands of porn or sexually oriented websites using freely accessible tools such as Google, various Web Scraping APIs, and the APIs which are made accessible by popular social networks service operators (such as Facebook and Twitter), to get as many naughty comments coming from all you boys and girls.

We searched among the comments to find the ones in which users left clear indication of their phone/mobile number to the sensual performer, and we put them in a database, along with a screensot of the page, its link and the date/time in which it was recorded.

incautious porn how-to

incautious porn how-to

We developed a little software which takes one random comment/link out of the database and uses it to create a beautiful generative painting and originality certificate.

We set up this website to put the paintings on sale.

Note: all the content used in the process is freely available online, in public forums/blogs/webcam-shows/social networks/etc.

More info coming soon

Are You At Risk? Nuclear campaigning with Greenpeace

Are You at Risk?

Are You at Risk?

Do you remember Nuclear Anxiety?

After one year from the Fukushima disaster we’ve teamed up with Greenpeace International to create an awareness and action campaign on the risks coming from nuclear energy.

Click HERE to start “Are You at Risk?”

The interactive map shows the locations of nuclear plants all over the world. By clicking on each one of them, detailed information pops up showing how many people live near the reactors and, thus, would find themselves in the same situations as the people who lived in Fukushima when the disaster took place.

(an enormous “thank you!” must be delivered to Declan Butler: he let us use a dataset he published, which was used as the foundation for this wonderful article on  Nature.)

In the campaign we go a step further.

By using the map you can connect to Facebook and Twitter. If you do it, the software grabs the information about your friends/followers and actively searches for the ones who live near nuclear plants (e.g.: the distance of their home location is less than 300km from a reactor).

When it finds them, it alerts them on social networks by tagging them on an image, pointing out the risks of living near a nuclear plant, and inspiring them to go to check out the map.

When you do this, you can browse the map and see additional information appear: the images and names of your social network buddies appear next to each reactor, indicating the people you love who would suffer from an accident in that location.

And, so: Are you at risk?

 

credits:

Art is Open Source: concept, technologies

Salvatore Barbera (Greenpeace International): project management and creative direction

Andrea Pinchi: visual design

Aslihan Tumer and Jan Beránek (Greenpeace International): Nuclear Campaigners

 

some links:

Are You at Risk? on Repubblica

Nuclear Anxiety featured on Visualizing 2011

NuclearAnxiety on Visualizing 2011

NuclearAnxiety on Visualizing 2011

Visualizing.org featured NuclearAnxiety in their video and end of year project, looking at the year’s major events through data visualization.

Click here to see Visualizing 2011

and click here to see NuclearAnxiety on Visualizing.org