OneMillionDreams at File Festival 2014 in S. Paulo

One Million Dreams will be featured at the File Festival 2014 in S. Paulo, Brazil.

This is the 15th edition of FILEElectronic Language International Festival in São Paulo –, which takes place this year from August 26 to October 5 at Centro Cultural FIESP – Ruth Cardoso.

The festival occupies four spaces in this venue: the Art Gallery, the SESI Digital Art Gallery (building facade), the FIESP Space, and the Mezzanine, besides the pavement of the Consolação, Trianon-Masp, and Brigadeiro subway stations.

The exhibition of FILE SP 2014 presents installations, interactive performances, animations, games designed for several platforms, machinima, video, net and sound art, as well as a selection of Japanese artists’ works in partnership with the Japan Media Arts Festival.

One Million Dreams is featured in the video art section of the festival.

One Million Dreams is a generative video that lasts around 200 hours which shows, instant by instant, a whole year of dreams captured from social networks.

One Million Dreams has been produced through the Human Ecosystems project.

A model of relations in Human Ecosystems: Relational Ecosystems

We just published an article on Human Ecosystems in which we describe the ways in which we can model the relationships in the Relational Ecosystems of cities.

The article is titled:

Relations in the Human Ecosystems: Cultures, Communities, Roles and Emergence

and you can read it here: http://human-ecosystems.com/home/relations-in-the-human-ecosystems-cultures-communities-roles-and-emergence/

It is interesting to use these models to gain understandings about how people relate and interact, describing people’s roles in these interactions.

These descriptions, of course, have variations through time and contexts. People participate to different communities and cultures at the same time, with broader or tighter scopes, their roles within them changing all the time, as well as their level of engagement and the layouts and configuration of their participation.

In the article we explore the basics of how we interpret relations in the Human Ecosystems, and use the assumptions to describe various roles which people commonly represent in the Relational Ecosystem: the Expert, the Hub, the Influencer, the Amplifier and the Bridge.

All of these roles allow us to understand how information and knowledge flow across the Relational Ecosystem of cities.

the Influencer

the Influencer

 

Micro Histories of cities and Ubiquitous Commons, at #visualize in Lecce

Join us for #visualize, more than one week of data, in Lecce (Italy) from May 8th to June 18th 2014, in the Palazzo Turrisi-Palumbo (via Marco Basseo 1), for an incredible series of workshops and lectures about visual journalism and data, in which we will create one full project of our own.

Here is the program for #visualize: http://www.gliadditivi.org/visualize/program.php

Visualize, more than a week on data

Visualize, more than a week on data

Speakers include John Grimwade, Leonardo RomeiMartin Foessleitner, Fabio Franchino.

Our talk will be on the 16th of June 2014, and it will be mostly based on the Human Ecosystems project, and on the idea of using the real-time, human-generated infoscape of the city to create a novel form of Public Space, which we call Ubiquitous Commons.

In the workshop, running from  June 16th to June 18th, we will use the Human Ecosystems to build an actual project.

You can use this link to subscribe to the workshop: http://www.gliadditivi.org/visualize/iscriviti.php.

Here below is some info about our intervention at #visualize:

Micro-histories of cities e Ubiquitous Commons

Ubiquitous emergent narratives in cities as novel public spaces.

Introduction

Each day, we generate thousands of information elements through electronic transactions, interactions with digital systems and social networks. Often we don’t realize it.

This mass of information constitutes the millions of micro-histories of our cities, in real-time, manifesting themselves during our everyday lives, while we shop or communicate using social networks.

Micro-histories unite to form macro-histories, the story of the city in which multitudes of people take part to an enormous data-symphony from which citizens’ changes, desires, emotions, vision and expectancies emerge, as well as the ones of organizations and administrations.

Through the Human Ecosystems project we observe in real-time citizens’ public expressions on social networks to describe the relational ecosystem of cities: the emergence of communities, of the themes which they discuss, and of their emotional expressions. This information can be interweaved with other sources of Open and Big Data, and with the flows of news and information, to enact a system in which cities – and their citizens – express themselves, and, most important of all, which can be used as a tool for participation, organization and planning, by everyone. A new common: the Digital Public Space of the city.

Talk:

The millions of micro-histories of cities: Human Ecosystems e Ubiquitous Commons.

During the talk we will introduce the Human Ecosystems project, and the concept of Ubiquitous Commons. We will show how to harvest public information from social networks to describe cities’ relational ecosystem: the emergence of communities, the issues which they discuss and their emotional expressions.

We will confront with the legal, political, conceptual, theoretical, technical and technological scenarios according highlighting the opportunities raised by enacting processes of this kind.

We will introduce the current operative scenarios of the Human Ecosystems, and the ways in which we are using them in the cities of Rome, S. Paulo, Malmö, Montreal, Toronto.

We will show how this information can be published as a form of real-time Open Data, and how it can be used in conjunction with other sources of Open and Big Data to obtain results which are relevant for citizens, administrations, enterprises, artists and designers.

Workshop:

Strategic and narrative usage scenarios for the Relational Ecosystems of cities.

We will start from a practical issue (public transport, pollution, the job market…) to setup a working scenario for the Human Ecosystems, from the point of view of one of the possible subjects involved (citizens, enterprises, administrations…).

We will show how to interweave the data from the relational ecosystem of the city with other data sources to obtain peculiar and relevant information.

For simplicity, we will use the data that has been harvested in a specific city across a 6 month period, without getting into the implementation details needed to create a system for real-time observation and for natural language analysis. Nevertheless, these techniques will be explained and proper references will be given, together with the possibility to use the Human Ecosystems.

The harvested information will be used to obtain the two outcomes of the workshop: an info-aesthetic, complexity-oriented, visualization, and the description of a possible strategy for intervention onto the selected issue, using the Urban Acupuncture technique.

Desired skills for the workshop:

  • basic knowledge of HTML, CSS and JavaScript (we will work in groups, so at least one member of each group should possess these skills )

During the workshop we will use:

Visualize, brand

Visualize, brand

Visualize partners

Visualize partners

Yale World Fellowship 2014

Salvatore Iaconesi has just been selected as Yale World Fellow 2014.

During the fellowship, which will last from August to December 2014, he will expand the concept of Ubiquitous Commons, in an attempt to reframe the concept of Public Space, to adapt it to the current and future scenarios of human life, in which ubiquitous digital technologies and networks have radically transformed the ways in which we relate, work, learn, communicate and collaborate.

Here are the Yale World Fellows for 2014: https://digitalworldfellows.squarespace.com/

Here is Salvatore’s profile on Yale World Fellowship website.

And here is the official press release:

YALE News Release

Contact:
Uma Ramiah, uma.ramiah@yale.edu, (203) 432-1916
Director of Communications, Yale World Fellows 
http://worldfellows.yale.edu

Sixteen Global Leaders Named 2014 Yale World Fellows

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. – A robotics engineer, an award winning actress and director, a Syrian peace activist, a 2012 candidate for President of Iceland and 12 other multitalented, global leaders have been named 2014 Yale World Fellows. This year’s cohort brings the total number of World Fellows since the program’s inception in 2002 to 257, representing 83 countries.

“Like prior cohorts, this year’s Fellows are dynamic, high impact practitioners committed to effecting positive change,” said Yale World Fellows Director Michael Cappello, professor of Pediatrics at Yale School of Medicine. “Through the Fellowship, Yale will provide these global leaders the valuable opportunity to take a step back from the intensity of their work and to develop a strategic vision for elevated impact at the national and international level.”

Yale World Fellows is Yale University’s signature global leadership development. Each year, the University invites a group of exemplary mid-career professionals from a wide range of fields and countries for an intensive four-month period of academic enrichment and leadership training.

“It is a privilege to welcome these impressive leaders to campus,” said Yale President Peter Salovey. “Each year, World Fellows enrich the educational experience of Yale students through participation in classes, delivering presentations on campus, and individual mentoring. Through their experiences on the ground, they also provide valuable context and practical perspectives that inform the scholarly pursuits of Yale faculty seeking to address today’s most pressing global challenges. This innovative program continues to represent the very best of Yale’s efforts to educate and inspire future leaders.”

The Fellows:

Yale World Fellows are mid-career professionals with an exceptional record of accomplishment in the public, private, or non-profit sector. Selected from thousands of applicants, they are dynamic, creative practitioners and disruptive thinkers. Fellows work across national boundaries and disciplines: in technology, art, finance, politics, social entrepreneurship, government, media, advocacy and more. Each cohort is carefully assembled, taking into account geographical, cultural, economic, and sector diversity and a rich variety of political and social views.

The Program:
The Yale World Fellows Flagship Program recruits 16 international Fellows to Yale each year for an intense and transformative confluence of ideas, worldviews and experiences. Fellows partake in both structured and individualized learning opportunities, with access to Yale’s unparalleled academic resources and world-renowned faculty. The Program creates space and time to broaden perspectives and deepen funds of knowledge – presenting a unique opportunity in today’s fast moving world. From August to December, the 2014 World Fellows will participate in specially designed seminars in leadership, management, and global affairs taught by leading Yale faculty; audit any of the 3,000 courses offered at the University; engage in discussion and debate with a wide range of distinguished guest speakers; receive individualized professional development training; and deliver public talks on their work, their countries, and the issues about which they are passionate.

The Mission:

The mission of Yale World Fellows is to cultivate and empower a community of globally engaged leaders committed to positive change through cross-disciplinary dialogue and action. We challenge leaders to become more agile and creative in response to the pressures of accelerating change. We encourage them to think beyond their disciplines and sectors, and to question the status quo. Our work is based on the belief that effective leaders need broad knowledge, a network of trusted collaborators, and the courage to create “new normals” in all sectors of society.

See http://worldfellows.yale.edu/2014 for digital version of this release with bios.

For more information on the program, visit http://worldfellows.yale.edu

Yale World Fellows logo

Yale World Fellows logo

 

 

Augmented Reality Art: the Emotional Compass featured on a new book

The Emotional Compass featured in a chapter of the new “Augmented Reality Art” book from Springer, edited by Vladimir Geroimenko together with Mark Skwarek, Tamiko Thiel, Gregory L. Ulmer, John Craig Freeman, Conor McGarrigle, Patrick Lichty, Geoffrey Alan Rhodes, Jacob Garbe, Todd Margolis, Kim Vincs, Alison Bennett, John McCormick, Jordan Beth Vincent, Stephanie Hutchison, Ian Gwilt, Judson Wright, Nathan Shafer, Salvatore Iaconesi, Oriana Persico, Dragoş Gheorghiu and Livia Ştefan, Simona Lodi, Margaret Dolinsky, Damon Loren Baker.

view Augmented Reality Art on Springer

In the book our contribution is titled: “An Emotional Compass: Emotions on Social Networks and a new Experience of Cities

cite as:

Iaconesi, S. and Persico, O. (2014). “An Emotional Compass: Emotions on Social Networks and a new Experience of Cities” in Augmented Reality Art: From an Emerging Technology to a Novel Creative Medium, part of the Springer Series on Cultural Computing, Geroimenko, Vladimir (Ed.). New York: Springer. ISBN 978-3-319-06202-0. http://www.springer.com/computer/hci/book/978-3-319-06202-0

Here is a short sample of the introduction of the chapter:

“The map is not the territory.” (Korzybski, 1933)

 

“The map is not the thing mapped.” (Bell, 1933)

 

“The tale is the map that is the territory.” (Gaiman, 2006)

 

“We say the map is different from the territory. But what is the territory? The territory never gets in at all. […] Always, the process of representation will filter it out so that the mental world is only maps of maps, ad infinitum.” (Bateson, 1972)

 

When we experience territories, we create stories. We model these stories using mental maps, referring to one person’s point of view perception of their own world, influenced by that person’s culture, background, mood and emotional state, instantaneous goals and objectives.

 

If we move along the streets of my city in a rush, trying to find a certain type of shop or building, our experience will be different than the one we would have had if we were searching for something else.

 

Focus will change. We will see certain things and not notice other ones which we would have noticed otherwise. Some things we will notice because they are familiar, common, or because associate them to our cultures, to memories and narratives. All this process continuously goes on as our feelings, emotions, objectives and daily activities change, creating the tactics according to which we traverse places and spaces, to do the things we do.

 

In the density of cities, this process happens for potentially millions of people at the same time. In his “the Image of the City” (Lynch, 1960), Lynch described cities as complex time-based media, symphonies produced by millions of people at the same time in their polyphonic way of acting, moving, interpreting, perceiving and transforming the ambient around themselves: a massive, emergent, real-time, dissonant and randomly harmonic, work of time-based art with millions of authors that change all the time.

 

In this, our mental maps – the personal representations of the city which we build in our minds to navigate them to fulfill our needs and desires – live a complex life as our perception joins into the great performance of the city.

 

Dissonance is the essence of the city itself, and represents its complexity, density and opportunities for interaction.

 

Augmented Reality Art

Augmented Reality Art