The Real Time Museum of the City and the Ubiquitous Commons

A public gathering in Rome, uniting administrations, politics, civil society and the cultures of the Italian capital become the occasion to explore the Human Ecosystems, the Real Time Museum of the City and the Ubiquitous Commons: the emergence of a vision of the relational ecosystem of the city and of the transformation of citizenship in the age of ubiquitous information.

This will happen in Rome, on July 7th 2014, from 3pm to 7:30pm at the Palazzo ex Pantanella, piazza Bocca della Verità 16.

You can visit the website http://ripartiamodaifori.it/ to learn more about the event (the website is in italian). You can also Download the Press Release and Download the Program for the event here (both are the official releases, in Italian).

The Real Time Museum of the City

What if there was a museum, in each city, which did not have in display paintings, sculptures or the archives and exhibits which we are all used to imagining when we think about Museums, but the “life of the city”, in real-time?

What if, in this Museum, you could play with the real-time life of the city, exploring the cultures, communities and relations which constantly form and transform in the city, between citizens of all ages, administrations, cultures, companies, organisations?

What if, in this Museum, you could learn how to understand these relationships, and how to use them to create a novel form of citizenship, in which citizens are positive, active, aware agents of their city, organising among themselves and with administrations and companies to promote and support the well-being of the city itself.

The Real Time Museum of the City

The Real Time Museum of the City

This is what we’re exploring with the Human Ecosystems project, starting in Sao Paulo, Rome, Montreal, Toronto, Lecce, Budapest and, really soon, in other major cities across the planet.

Ubiquitous Commons

The Human Ecosystems project is tightly connected with the concept of Ubiquitous Commons (and we will be spending a whole semester at Yale, with a Yale World Fellowship, to explore this concept and publish the first results).

With the idea of the Ubiquitous Commons we wish to highlight that a massive transformation has already happened for human beings.

Ubiquitous Information, mobile technologies, sensors, pervasive digital transaction, content, information and interaction have radically transformed the ways in which we perceive public and private spaces, as well as the ways in we relate, communicate, work, express, consume, share knowledge and information.

The world, today, sits in a grey area in which this radical transformation has already happened (and is constantly continuing to happen), and laws, regulations, social and cultural conventions, critical perceptions have not yet learned how to understand and cope with them, leaving us in a state of continuous, rapid, incomprehensible, opaque revolution of the boundaries of what is public and what is private (and the radical consequences which this has), which is controlled by entities whose interest does not lie in the public well-being.

Affecting everything from privacy, to transparency, to openness, to participatory governance, to shared knowledge, information, and even up to health and personal well-being (just think about all the things you can achieve through biometrics, quantified-self and more).

Ubiquitous Commons

Ubiquitous Commons

Through Ubiquitous Commons we wish to address this domain: to create a common effort through which Ubiquitous Information, of the many kinds which affect our daily lives – wether we realise it or not – becomes open, accessible, usable to us, as citizens and human beings, to perform this transformation which has already happened, and to mutate it into a chance for our expression and freedoms, giving us the chance to create new ecologies and economies, based on openness, accessibility, inclusion and participation.

The two issues (the Real-Time Museum of the City and Ubiquitous Commons) are closely connected, as the Real Time Museum of the City is a sort of iconic presence in the City of the concept of the Ubiquitous Commons: the place of perception and beauty in which one starts to comprehend, learn and use the Relational Ecosystem of the city, to perform this transformation, to perceive a new possibility for citizenship.

an Emotional Compass: new ideas for wayfinding in cities

Why would we need an Emotional Compass?

And, first of all, what is an Emotional Compass?

“The map is not the territory.” – A. Korzybski

 

“The map is not the thing mapped.” – E.T. Bell

 

“The tale is the map that is the territory.” – N. Gaiman

 

“We say the map is different from the territory. But what is the territory? The territory never gets in at all. […] Always, the process of representation will filter it out so that the mental world is only maps of maps, ad infinitum.” – G. Bateson

When we experience territories, we create stories.

We model these stories using mental maps. These maps have seldom anything to do with what actually lies within the territories themselves. A mental map refers to one person’s point of view perception of their own world, and is influenced by that person’s culture, background, mood and emotional state, instantaneous goals and objectives.

If we move along the streets of my city in a rush, trying to find a certain type of shop or building, our experience will be different than the one we would have had if we were searching for something else.

Focus will change.

We will see certain things and not notice other ones which we would have noticed otherwise.

Some things we will notice because they are familiar, common, or because associate them to memories and narratives. Some will stand out because they react with some element of our culture or background.

All this process continuously goes on as our feelings, emotions, objectives and daily activities change, creating the tactics according to which we traverse places and spaces, to do the things we do.

In the density of cities, this process happens for potentially millions of people at the same time.

In his “the Image of the City”, Kevin Lynch described cities as complex time-based media, symphonies produced by millions of people at the same time in their polyphonic way of acting, moving, interpreting, perceiving and transforming the ambient around themselves: a massive, emergent, real-time, dissonant and randomly harmonic, work of time-based art with millions of authors that change all the time.

In this, our mental maps – the personal representations of the city which we build in our minds to navigate them to fulfil our needs and desires – live a complex life as our perception joins into the great performance of the city.

Dissonance is the essence of the city itself, and represents its complexity, density and opportunities for interaction.

Harmony represents affordances, the things which are recognised and shared by different cultures.

Those elements of the perceptive landscape onto which we can agree upon, which we recognise and attribute compatible meanings, allowing us to collaborate, meet, do things together.

For example, Haken and Portugali have suggested a broad definition of landmarks to refer to any distinguished city elements that shape our mental map. Or as Appleyard, Golledge and Spector who have conducted studies about the imageability of urban elements not because of their visual stimulus but because they possess some personal, historical, or cultural meaning.

These features found within our mental maps enable the possibility to design the affordances of places and spaces. We can use the understanding of what is consistently recognized and understood to design the elements of space/time which will be able to describe to people what is allowed or prohibited, suggested or advised against, possible or imaginable.

Lynch’s concepts of legibility and imageability are closely related to James J. Gibson’s notion of affordances developed in his direct perception theory, according to which the objects of the environment can afford different activities to various individuals and contexts. And, again, in Haken and Portugali, all elements of a city afford remembering, as they shape in the mental maps in human minds.

In a further step in the direction of citizen activation, we can also imagine to make this type of understanding widely known and usable, to enable people to express themselves (and their mental maps of how they perceive the world) more effectively and powerfully.

These possibilistic scenarios have become radically viable with the widespread of ubiquitous technologies. Nomadic devices (such as smartphones) and their applications we are able to merge our physical understanding of the world with the digital one: the two have, in fact, become so interweaved and interconnected as to form a new physicality, visuality and tactility which shape our everyday experiences of the world.

According to Mitchell’s “City of Bits”, McCullough’s Digital Ground, Zook’s and Graham’s DigiPlace we are constantly immersed in emergent networks of interconnected data, information and knowledge which is produced by millions of different sources and subjects in the course of their daily lives.

This data and information radically shapes the ways in which we have learned to work, learn, collaborate, relate, consume and perceive our environment.

If we are strolling in a park and we receive a notification of some sort on our smartphone, the natural environment could instantly transform into an ubiquitous, temporary office.

If we want to make a decision about a certain thing we would like to purchase while in a shop, a quick look online will help define our opinion in ways that can be very powerful.

If we receive a message on our smartphone, our mood could change for the rest of the day.

Situated and ubiquitous information is able to powerfully transform, in real-time, the ways in which we experience places, objects and services, by providing the wide accessibility of other people’s stories, emotions, expectations and visions.

This scenario is the one we have tried to address in our research: the conceptualisation, design and implementation of a tool for urban navigation, in which the emotional, narratives expressed by people while inhabiting and using urban places, spaces and objects become instantly and radically available, accessible and usable.

We used this approach to define a novel vision on the opportunity to design new types of affordances for our cities.

We have decided to start from the idea of a Compass.

You can find a first result of our research here at the following link:

An Emotional Compass Harvesting Geo-located Emotional States from User Generated Content on Social Networks and Using them to Create a Novel Experience of Cities

An Emotional Compass harvesting emotions from social networks

An Emotional Compass harvesting emotions from social networks

Art, Future and Technologies at Provocazioni Festival, Acrobax

provocazioni festival

provocazioni festival

Saturday Sept. 28th we will be at Provocazioni Festival, at Acrobax (via della Vasca Navale 6, Rome, Italy) to talk about Art, the Future and the role of Technologies in the transformation of our societies.

Here is the Facebook Event for the Provocazioni Festival, where you can join in.

We will be there right after the morning event in which we will present the Cultural Ecosystem of the City of Rome, together with the City Administration.

Together with us will be:

Carlo Infante: Professor, Journalist and Performing Media expert

http://www.urbanexperience.it/

Pietro Montani: Professor in Aesthetics at the “La Sapienza” University of Rome

Dario Cecchi: Researcher in Aesthetics at the “La Sapienza” University of Rome

Maia Borelli: Researcher in Performative Arts  at the “La Sapienza” University of Rome

The Pilss_youtubers e videomakers.

http://www.webseriestv.it/the-pills

Ubiquitous Pompei: the future of the city, created by high school students

The future of the city in Pompei, as created by high school students.

the icon of Ubiquitous Pompei mobile app

the icon of Ubiquitous Pompei mobile app

You are invited to come at the event in which we will present the outcomes of our project in Pompei during which we invited high school students to create the digital future of their city.

Click here to access the event details on Facebook

Event Program:

December 13th, 2011, 12:00, in Piazza Bartolo Longo n 36, Pompei
Preview of the system and “Augmented Reality Promenade”, to discover the digital city
**Media and Press**

December 14th, 2011, 10:00 – Conference Hall at the building of the Administration of the City of Pompei
Presentation of the results of the series of events “McLuhan meets Pompei”: presentation of the project outcomes and ceremony in which participating students will be awarded their certificate of participation to the project.
**Open Event**

ABOUT THE PROJECT

“UBIQUITOUS POMPEI” is the result of the workshop “the Electronic Man. Ubquitous Writing and Identities”, an experimental laboratory focusing on ubiquitous publishing technologies and methodologies created by FakePress Publishing and Art is Open Source for the project “McLuhan meets Pompei”.

The laboratory took place on November 11th and 12th 2011, engaging 120 students in their 3rd, 4th and 5th year of high school and coming from two schools: the Liceo Socio-Psico Pedagogico E. Pascal and the Istituto Bartolo Longo.

One of the services in action on Ubiquitous Pompei

One of the services in action on Ubiquitous Pompei

Two days of intensive workshop on ubiquitous publishing: the possibility to transform bodies, architectures, objects and entire cities into novel spaces for publication.

The concepts at the base of the Electronic Man have been used to introduce this complex subject to students using the language of arts and performance, to be able to build together with students accessible cross-media content using Augmented Reality and QRCodes.

To achieve this, we used two open source, free platforms (MACME and NeoReality) produced by FakePress Publishing.

the web interface of Ubiquitous Pompei, with all the prototype content on the map

the web interface of Ubiquitous Pompei, with all the prototype content on the map

Workshops ended by inviting the students to imagine their own version of the “augmented city”.

The last phase of the project took place over the network: an intense discussion and collaboration process using email and Facebook allowed students to define their project ideas and to design 4 complete ideas working on the concept of augmented cartography, geo-localized social networks and ubiquitous narratives. (the ideas are presented on the project website)

Art is Open Source and FakePress Publishing set-up the technological platforms needed to activate students’ ideas, and transform them into a working prototype of their vision of what Augmented Pompei could be.

Ubiquitous Pompei originates from this process: the platform hosts all 4 designs and the project documentation, including the materials used during the workshops and the software tools used in the process.

Students and teachers have a direct access to the platform, allowing them to autonomously continue the experiments in the evolution of the current ideas or in the creation of new scenarios.

One of the projects in Ubiquitous Pompei, an augmented reality translation of the ancient roman graffiti

One of the projects in Ubiquitous Pompei, an augmented reality translation of the ancient roman graffiti

SPECIAL THANKS go to

all participating students: Antonella Abagnale, Daniela Alfano, Valentina Alvino, Consiglia Ammaturo, Sofia Ardizio, Gennaro Avitabile, Belmattino Francesca, Imma Lusy Carotenuto, Angela Chierchia, Maria D’Amaro, Gaetano D’Amora, Valentina D’Aquino, Teresa Di Dato, Di Nola Fabiano, Anna Di Palma, Maria Grazia Di Rosa, Paola Ferrara, Rosa Formisano, Maria Luigia Gargiulo,Rosalba Anna Gabbiano, Maria Galotto, Maria Pia Gazzetta, Elena Giordano, Melania Giordano, Raffaella Langella, Maria Loganini, Patrizia Marrano, Adriana Martino, Alessandra Martino, Annapaola Savarese, Caterina Napoli, Concetta Panariello, Carolina Piacente, Cristina Troise, Roberta Valerio, Giuseppe Vispini, Maria Teresa Vorraro, Pasqualina Zinno;
i professori Mario Bobba e Alfonso Carotenuto;

the schools: Liceo Socio-pedagogico E. Pascal and Istituto Bartolo Longo di Pompei;

Maria Pia Rossignaud, Ass. ONLUS Amici di MediaDuemila, MediaDuemila Magazine and Osservatorio TuttiMedia;

Antonio Irlando;

vice-mayor Claudio Alfano and mayor Claudio D’Alessio (Pompei) ;

Ruben Santillan;

Gaia De Nicola;

the City of Pompei and all its citizens

CREDITS

[1] “UBIQUITOUS POMPEI” is a project designed and produced by :
FakePress Publishing e AOS – Art is Open Source
Concept e Development:
Salvatore Iaconesi e Oriana Persico
Technologies:
MACME & Neoreality by FakePress Publishing

[2] “McLuhan meets Pompei” is an initiative promoted by:
Ass. ONLUS Amici di MediaDuemila
with the support and collaboration of:
Assessorato alla Comunicazione e Innovazione tecnologica del Comune di Pompei, MediaDuemila,Osservatorio TuttiMedia

Curated by:
Maria Pia Rossignaud

[3]“The Electronic Man. Ubiquitous Writing and Identities” is a workshop created by:
FakePress Publishing e AOS – Art is Open Source
Promoted by:
Ass. ONLUS Amici di MediaDuemila
with the support and collaboration of:Assessorato alla Comunicazione e Innovazione tecnologica del Comune di Pompei

Concept and Development:
Salvatore Iaconesi e Oriana Persico
Technologies:
MACME & Neoreality by FakePress Publishing

WEB SITES:

http://www.fakepress.it/
http://www.artisopensource.net/
http://www.amicidimediaduemila.it/
http://www.mediaduemila.it/

Info & Contact: oriana@fakepress.net

Project Site: http://artisopensource.net/pompeiAR/