10 Minutes in Detroit

An information visualisation built using the Human Ecosystems will be featured at the Gallery Project, in Detroit, for the Unseen exhibit.

10 Minutes in Detroit captures all the social networking activity in the city of Detroit on June 30th 2014 and visualises it in a series of different ways, using the Human Ecosystems ( http://human-ecosystems.com/home/ ).

The exhibit will be in Detroit from August 1st to August 31st, 2014 (Eastern Market, 1550 Winder, across from Red Bull House of Art, Detroit, MI) and in Ann Arbor from September 12th to October 12th, 2014 (Ann Arbor Art Center, Ann Arbor, MI).

Unseen is curated by Rocco DePietro and Gloria Pritschet

The quest to see lies at the heart of human urgency. To breach the barrier between the visible and the invisible is compelling, emotional, informative and even magical. This process of discovery has always driven thinkers and image makers: artists, scientists and philosophers, from astronomers to nanotechnologists, from documentarians and data analysts to planners and prognosticators. As the unseen becomes seeable and seen, a pivot occurs, revealing and demanding irreversible change. No one who has seen is ever the same.

The invisible may be unseen for many reasons. It may be purposely covert for socio-political or military reasons, or to hide corruption or actions contrary to the public good. It may be inadvertently unseen because of the limits of technology or its applications, or the limits of human perception or comprehension. It may be willfully unseen from lack of curiosity, imagination, salience, awareness, or limitations of perceptual processes.

Many contemporary artists and scientists are dedicated to expressing the unseen and to making the invisible visible. They may be motivated to advance their disciplines, or may be fascinated by the prospect of discovery, or the challenge and adventure of harnessing emerging technologies to express ideas. They may believe it is important to uncover secrets, to disclose purposely hidden information, some of which strikes at the heart of democracy, personal privacy, individual well-being, individual freedom, the public’s right to know, and the health and survival of planet Earth. They may seek to awaken consciousness to initiate conversation about outcomes, implications and possibilities.

This exhibition invites the participants to visualize and express the unseen, and to comment on the impacts of the transformed vista.

In Unseen, participants’ work may express a range of conceptual dimensions. For example, they may be disclosing the purposely hidden or the inadvertently unseen. They may seek out significant and impactful information or simply delight in the creative, visually beautiful or surprising. Participants’ work may also express a range of thresholds of visibility. For example, they may be exploring micro, meso or macro levels of invisibility, from microbial and sub-atomic worlds to social, global and universal phenomena. Several examples follow:

The Hubble and Kepler telescopes are discovering evidence of earthlike and superhabitable planets, whose conditions for sustain carbon-based life surpass those of earth. However much of space is unseen by us, for intentional covert reasons or because we lack the means to perceive it.

In his book Dark Skies, Trevor Paglen, uses time-lapse photography with super sensitive equipment to capture images of military spy satellites streaking across the night sky. Photographed over a landscape reminiscent of Ansel Adams, the images are chilling reminder of what’s up there unseen.

Remote sensors and sonar probe deep within the earth and below the ocean floor in places like the arctic (where over 90% of Russia’s natural gas is located) mapping caches of gold, uranium, and rare earth minerals. Private corporations often own the proprietary maps. These same technologies offer crucial information to science, for example, in marine and desert archeology and research.

Environmental pollution related to deep earth mineral and gas extraction, and droughts; ancient aquifers are drained, the land debased, the water supply is poisoned and behind the guise of efficiency and technological advances.

Study of long term-data for natural cycles and systems reveals climate patterns, meteoric and volcanic activity, intense solar storms, and models their relationship to human activity and potential catastrophic impacts.

Disadvantaged individuals and groups that are invisible due to personal attitudes, social policy, and a history of neglect, e.g., the elderly and incarcerated black youth.

Architects and artists are working to reinterpret space in cities. Art is Open Source depicts the layers formed by people who uniquely shape the space through their use of mobile devices, ubiquitous technologies, and social networks.

Data art amasses complex critical information and presents it visually appealing and easily readable formats. Josh Begley, the originator of Dronestream, which documents the increase in drone strikes in the past decade, has created a new Apple App, Metadata, which documents drone strikes in real time.

Genetic research and engineering have enabled modification and selection of traits in foods, opening broad argument about health, safety, the power of chemical companies, and international meddling.

The Human Genome Project has sequenced the chemical base pairs of human DNA, making possible cloning technologies and genetic choice (babies by design). Private companies offer genetic tests for illness predisposition. This new era in genetics opens reconsideration of human identity, illness and morality.

Google Earth Outreach is mapping indigenous people around the world. The project protects 600,000 acres of the Surui of Brazil from exploitation, illegal mining and logging Photographer Martin Schoeller, with National Geographic, is bringing the issues facing lost tribes to global attention. Impact of such projects on their way of life is uncertain.

Animal research has revealed highly differentiated sounds and as yet untranslated complex language among elephants, dolphins, and other mammals. Increased understanding of animal language, emotion and culture challenges narrow preconceptions of animals as lesser beings, as food or objects for our entertainment.

American intelligence gathering is largely covert and secret. Edward Snowden, in revealing the extent of information collected about ordinary citizens, awakened awareness and initiated a change in generally held assumptions.

Cyber warfare, increasing in sophistication and run by rogue and government sanctioned hackers, challenges the security of nuclear facilities, financial systems, and personal data. There are no visual maps for understanding cybercrime.

Secret drone strikes in Yemen or Pakistan are supported by networks of underwater fiber optic cables, military satellites and command centers, remote sensing and vision systems, and superfast computers. Congress’ decision to continue their control in the CIA, rather than to transfer it to the Defense Department insures that they remain secret.

HAARP (The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) is an ionospheric research program jointly funded by the Defense Department and private contractors. HAARP analyzes the ionosphere and investigates the potential for developing ionospheric enhancement technology for radio communications and surveillance. Some say one of its goals is to transmit electricity wirelessly. Based in Gakona, Alaska, some experts say that HAARP is capable of modifying weather, disabling satellites, causing air crashes, earthquakes, droughts, storms, floods, and even disease.

There is a whole category of contemporary art this is full of technical and creative surprises. These works might involve hidden images, inference of the presence of the objects and content when they are not there, and movement that alters the visual and perceptual field. Some can only be fully realized with the participation and imagination of the viewer.

The Real Time Museum of the City and the Ubiquitous Commons

A public gathering in Rome, uniting administrations, politics, civil society and the cultures of the Italian capital become the occasion to explore the Human Ecosystems, the Real Time Museum of the City and the Ubiquitous Commons: the emergence of a vision of the relational ecosystem of the city and of the transformation of citizenship in the age of ubiquitous information.

This will happen in Rome, on July 7th 2014, from 3pm to 7:30pm at the Palazzo ex Pantanella, piazza Bocca della Verità 16.

You can visit the website http://ripartiamodaifori.it/ to learn more about the event (the website is in italian). You can also Download the Press Release and Download the Program for the event here (both are the official releases, in Italian).

The Real Time Museum of the City

What if there was a museum, in each city, which did not have in display paintings, sculptures or the archives and exhibits which we are all used to imagining when we think about Museums, but the “life of the city”, in real-time?

What if, in this Museum, you could play with the real-time life of the city, exploring the cultures, communities and relations which constantly form and transform in the city, between citizens of all ages, administrations, cultures, companies, organisations?

What if, in this Museum, you could learn how to understand these relationships, and how to use them to create a novel form of citizenship, in which citizens are positive, active, aware agents of their city, organising among themselves and with administrations and companies to promote and support the well-being of the city itself.

The Real Time Museum of the City

The Real Time Museum of the City

This is what we’re exploring with the Human Ecosystems project, starting in Sao Paulo, Rome, Montreal, Toronto, Lecce, Budapest and, really soon, in other major cities across the planet.

Ubiquitous Commons

The Human Ecosystems project is tightly connected with the concept of Ubiquitous Commons (and we will be spending a whole semester at Yale, with a Yale World Fellowship, to explore this concept and publish the first results).

With the idea of the Ubiquitous Commons we wish to highlight that a massive transformation has already happened for human beings.

Ubiquitous Information, mobile technologies, sensors, pervasive digital transaction, content, information and interaction have radically transformed the ways in which we perceive public and private spaces, as well as the ways in we relate, communicate, work, express, consume, share knowledge and information.

The world, today, sits in a grey area in which this radical transformation has already happened (and is constantly continuing to happen), and laws, regulations, social and cultural conventions, critical perceptions have not yet learned how to understand and cope with them, leaving us in a state of continuous, rapid, incomprehensible, opaque revolution of the boundaries of what is public and what is private (and the radical consequences which this has), which is controlled by entities whose interest does not lie in the public well-being.

Affecting everything from privacy, to transparency, to openness, to participatory governance, to shared knowledge, information, and even up to health and personal well-being (just think about all the things you can achieve through biometrics, quantified-self and more).

Ubiquitous Commons

Ubiquitous Commons

Through Ubiquitous Commons we wish to address this domain: to create a common effort through which Ubiquitous Information, of the many kinds which affect our daily lives – wether we realise it or not – becomes open, accessible, usable to us, as citizens and human beings, to perform this transformation which has already happened, and to mutate it into a chance for our expression and freedoms, giving us the chance to create new ecologies and economies, based on openness, accessibility, inclusion and participation.

The two issues (the Real-Time Museum of the City and Ubiquitous Commons) are closely connected, as the Real Time Museum of the City is a sort of iconic presence in the City of the concept of the Ubiquitous Commons: the place of perception and beauty in which one starts to comprehend, learn and use the Relational Ecosystem of the city, to perform this transformation, to perceive a new possibility for citizenship.

XY: a Castle, a Lab and the Near Future of Education

Art is Open Source will be at XY Lab in Puglia, from the 17th to the 31st of July, in the beautiful castle of Castrignano de’ Greci, for a massive workshop on knowledge, data, information, Human Ecosystems and the Near Future of Education.

It will be the first workshop to participate to the Knowledge Ecosystem we have been creating with the Knowpen Foundation. (learn more about the new education system we’ve been creating, HERE)

 

Information

The workshop is FREE, you will be in a beautiful castle with us and multiple other designers and researchers from all over the world, exploring the themes of “New Publishing” and “videomHacking“: new ways to tell stories and to create shared, ubiquitous narratives and participatory ecosystems.

The lab is divided in two interconnected experiences: X and Y.

X has been created by FF3300 and by Pazlab, Y has been created by Inuit and Dinamo Film, and both are implemented with the support of Laboratori dal Basso.

You can see more info about the the XY Lab HERE, and you can apply HERE.

 

The Near Future of Education

This will be an important workshop for us. For two reasons.

The first one: after the global event “Education is a Commons“, in which people from all over the world took part in the initial design of the Near Future Education System we’re defining, XY will constitute the first massive effort to create the tools and techniques through which this system will come to life.

We will be inventing and designing communication strategies, software, information visualizations for the Knowledge Common, the Alternative Currency which is used in the Education Ecosystem, the information visualizations which will show the well being of the ecosystem itself, including the relations, economies and productions which take place within it and thanks to it. We will be designing and implementing the Ecosystem itself, creating a peer-to-peer knowledge environment, an ubiquitous network-of-networks.

We will try to answer an enormous question: how is an inclusive, ubiquitous, participatory, mutualistic knowledge ecosystem made?

The second reason regards the fact that XY Lab will also be the first participatory education process which will actually take part to the Knowledge Ecosystem of the new Education System which we’re designing!

This means that all materials, documentation and tools will be open and accessible from the Ecosystem, that they will be usable in “recipes”, and that we will all be able to start assigning each other some Koinoos, the currency of the Knowledge Ecosystem, to evaluate the perception of how active we have been in participating to the well-being of the ecosystem: the new definition of value in the economy of the Education System we’re defining. (to know more about what this all means, you can read the initial description of the Education System designed by the Near Future Education Lab, follow developments on the P2P Foundation wiki, and join the Facebook Group of the Near Future Education Lab to ask us directly and start participating )

During the next months we will be openly supporting more projects, workshops, courses, tutorials, hackathons, learning environments, fablabs and more who will join the Knowledge Ecosystem, to start making the Near Future Education System a shared reality.

This is an important, fundamental first step!

XY Lab in the castle

XY Lab in the castle

Participants

The two-weeks workshop will be about New Publishing and VideomHacking. There will be two groups and multiple chances for cross-pollination.

We will be in the New Publishing area, exploring how to design and implement an ubiquitous knowledge ecosystem.

 

These are the teachers and tutors for the New Publishing area: X

Salvatore Iaconesihacker, designer and teacher at ISIA of Firenze

Oriana Persicohacker, designer and teacher at ISIA of Florence

Mauro Bubbicodesigner and teacher at ISIA of Urbino, among the leading experts in communications in Italy

Leonardo RomeiLecturer of Semiotics and member of the Academic senate at Isia (Higher education institute for industrial arts and design) of Urbino; co-founder of the communication design studio QZR. He received the PhD in Communication sciences from the Sapienza University of Rome and worked in the ESCoM – Cognitive semiotics and new medias team at FMSH (Fondation Maison des sciences de l’homme) in Paris. He gave several workshops and lectures and he wrote for Nova24 de Il Sole 24 ore, Alfabeta 2, iS Pearson, il Verri, Progetto Grafico. He is co-editor of the monographic issue of Progetto Grafico n. 25 “Text and Image in the Scientific Realm”.

Salvatore Zingalesemiotics teacher at Politecnico di Milano

Silvio Lorussoartist and designer. His ongoing PhD research in Design Sciences at Iuav University of Venice is focused on the intersections between publishing and digital technology from the perspective of art and design. Since 2013, he manages the Post-Digital Publishing Archive

Emilio Macchiagraphic designer and researcher, former participant at the JvE Academie, Maastricht. Curator of “Fahrenheit 39” – publishing fair and Head of “Offset” designers in residency program since 2011.

Antonio Vergari: analyst and informatics, a.i. and automatic learning system expert from Politecnico di Bari

Danilo di Cuiacreative technologist with a background in graphic design and a focus in human-computer interaction. In the past few years he has been crafting games, interfaces and interactive installations in the US and UK for clients such as ITV, Google and BBC. His latest installation ‘Collate’ has been selected for the London Design Festival and exhibited at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

Jacopo Pompiliivisual designer, currently attending a master’s degree in Communication Design at Politecnico di Milano. His bachelor final thesis at ISIA Urbino — Iperlibro (Hyperbook) — focused on digital publishing and new reading experiences specifically designed for new digital media.

Eugenio Battaglia: Neurosciences and biohacking expert

These are the teachers and tutors for the VideomHacking area: Y

Marcus Ströbelsoftware developer, contributor of Magic Lantern

Cosimo Bizzarri: storyteller and journalist, he’s currently working as the executive editor of COLORS Magazine and as a tutor at the Design faculty of the San Marino University

Gianpaolo D’Amico: PhD in Computer Science at the University of Florence, is freelance creative technologist for digital media and founder of the blog sounDesign

Paolo Patelli: PhD candidate at Politecnico di Milano, researches and designs between architecture, media technologies and public spheres

Giacomo Leonzi: has a degree in Science, and he currently works as a developer and interaction designer around the world

Nicholas Caporusso: researcher in the field of human computer interaction, and hospital risk management, CEO at QIRIS

Michelantonio Trizio: information engineer, hacker and enterpreneur, CTO ad QIRIS

Matteo De Mayda: photographer and art director based in Treviso. ADCI Award in 2012

Lea Dicursi: video-maker, video-editor and producer based in Barcellona. She had worked for Benetton, Colors Magazine and Fabrica

Matteo Bencini: interactive and web designer at Lcd s.r.l. in Florence

Ruggero Castagnola: IxD and Creative Technologist. Iuav graduate, currently research fellow at PoliMi

Giuditta Vendrame: designer and currently enrolled in Social Design Master at Design Academy Eindhoven

 

inside the castle

inside the castle

Join Us!

Join us for these two weeks of whorkshop! We’ll be happy to work with you.

The workshop is FREE!

You can see more info about the the XY Lab HERE, and you can apply HERE.

A model of relations in Human Ecosystems: Relational Ecosystems

We just published an article on Human Ecosystems in which we describe the ways in which we can model the relationships in the Relational Ecosystems of cities.

The article is titled:

Relations in the Human Ecosystems: Cultures, Communities, Roles and Emergence

and you can read it here: http://human-ecosystems.com/home/relations-in-the-human-ecosystems-cultures-communities-roles-and-emergence/

It is interesting to use these models to gain understandings about how people relate and interact, describing people’s roles in these interactions.

These descriptions, of course, have variations through time and contexts. People participate to different communities and cultures at the same time, with broader or tighter scopes, their roles within them changing all the time, as well as their level of engagement and the layouts and configuration of their participation.

In the article we explore the basics of how we interpret relations in the Human Ecosystems, and use the assumptions to describe various roles which people commonly represent in the Relational Ecosystem: the Expert, the Hub, the Influencer, the Amplifier and the Bridge.

All of these roles allow us to understand how information and knowledge flow across the Relational Ecosystem of cities.

the Influencer

the Influencer