Playing with Data: Ubiquitous Commons at King’s College in London

Come with us on June 3rd for a performative, full day workshop at King’s College in London in which we will experiment just how much data we generate as human beings, citizens and members of communities.

Register here!

Using the Human Ecosystems we will learn how to use this data in useful, positive and ethical ways, and how to regain control in deciding how this data should be used, through the Ubiquitous Commons.

These are the details for the workshop:

Workshop title: “Playing with Data in the Ubiquitous Commons”

Held by: Salvatore Iaconesi  and Oriana Persico

When: 3 June 2015 – 10:00-18:00

Where: King’s College London (Strand)

Playing with Data in the Ubiquitous Commons is a  day-long performative workshop using Human Ecosystems–a series of technologies are combined to harvest and analyse public data. We will explore our collective data to gain insight on the flows of communication, information, knowledge exchange, and of the patterns for emotional contagion. Together participants will use techniques such as Natural Language Analysis, Geo-referencing, Machine Learning, Network Analysis, and various Computational Sociology techniques to gather information about the communities in the city, including the places, locations, times, topics, emotions, opinions which they express, and the social architectures which they describe. Outputs will range from a series of research insights; interactive visualizations or installations; game concepts to be enacted with different communities; models for community engagement, and their testing through playful modalities; the description and enactment of meaningful urban rituals which promote public, inclusive collaboration and participation to city life under one or more issues.

The workshop is an interdisciplinary, critical and playful approach to our material assemblages as data-subjects; that is, our ubiquitous data and information generation, which express relations, emotions, locations, opinions, behaviours and the potential inferences therein. Participants will collectively explore the data and present insights. People of all levels of technological expertise are warmly welcome.

Salvatore Iaconesi is an interaction designer, robotics engineer, artist, hacker. TED Fellow 2012, Eisenhower Fellow since 2013 and Yale World Fellow 2014.

Oriana Persico holds a degree in Communication Sciences, is an expert in participatory policies and digital inclusion. She is an artist and writer and she currently teach Digital Design at ISIA Design Florence.

Register here!

An Open Source Cure for Cancer at King’s College in London

Join us at King’s College Department for Social Science Health and Medicine with the Bioethics and Society programme for a conversation on:

“The Cure”, an Open Source Cure for Cancer: a conversation with Oriana Persico and Salvatore Iaconesi

The network “Citizen Participation in Science and Medicine” is pleased to announce that Oriana Persico and Salvatore Iaconesi will be at SSHM on June 4th, 2015  to discus their project “La Cura” (The Cure), an Open Source Cure for Cancer: Hacking Participatory Medicine and the Biopolitics of Data.

When: June 4, 2015, 2-4 pm

Where: Room S -3.18, KCL Strand Campus.

When Salvatore Iaconesi was diagnosed with a brain cancer, he hacked his medical records and opened them up, transforming his disease into a participatory, collaborative performance. In the discussion, we will confront with the biopolitical implications of participatory medicine, and of the rituals of ethical hacking, as critical opportunities to reconsider the role of communities and societies in positive, constructive, inclusive ways.

Please register here (feel free to use this link if you want to invite others):

https://eventbrite.co.uk/event/16349197891/

For more information about “La Cura”, click here. You can also watch Salvatore’s Ted talk here.

For inquiries contact Dr Lorenzo Del Savio: lorenzo.del_savio@kcl.ac.uk

Ubiquitous Commons at Nexa Center for Internet & Society

Join us at Nexa Center for Internet & Society, on Wednesday April 8th 2015 from 6pm to 8pm, for an open discussion about and around the concept of the Ubiquitous Commons, the international research effort which is bringing about the development of a legal and technological toolkit through which people and organizations will be able to re-establish the power balance in deciding how their information is used.

The event will take place at Nexa, in Via Boggio 65/a, Turin (first floor).

There will be a live webcast of the event, HERE.

Learn more about the event HERE, by clicking on this link.

In occasion of the 74th Nexa Wednesday, a recurring event which each week brings together practitioners, theorists, researchers and academics to discuss important issues regarding technologies, society and the law, on April 8th, we will discuss the Ubiquitous Commons together with Salvatore Iaconesi, the research coordinator of the project, and Ugo Pagallo,  Professor at the University of Turin, Faculty Fellow at Nexa and who got interested in the project since its creation.

You can learn more about the Ubiquitous Commons HERE.

To keep up with the news about Ubiquitous Commons, follow this page: http://www.ubiquitouscommons.org/updates/

 

The Nexa Center for Internet & Society is born from the activities of an initially informal interdisciplinary group – with expertise in technology, law and economics – that grew up in Torino from 2003 and that has conceived, designed and implemented a number of initiatives: Creative Commons Italia (2003-present),CyberLaw Torino (2004), Harvard Internet Law Program Torino (2005), SeLiLi, free legal advice on open licenses for creators and programmers (2006-present), COMMUNIA, the European Commission-funded thematic network of 50 partners aimed at studying the digital public domain (2007-2011), Neubot, a software project on network neutrality (2008-present), and LAPSI, the European thematic network on legal aspects of public sector information funded by the European Commission (2010-2012).

The Participatory Condition: Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing

Together with Alessandro Delfanti we have just finished writing a chapter on the forthcoming book “The Participatory Condition“, forthcoming on the University of Minnesota Press.

The chapter is titled: “Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing“, and it deals with La Cura project, which we created when Salvatore Iaconesi became diseased with brain cancer, and decided to turn the situation into a biopolitical performance interweaving hacking, society, anthropology and sciences.

From the chapter:

“While patient reclamation of the medicalized body is becoming a more common subject of discussion, by proposing the concept of the ritual we have here focused on the cultural significance of biodigital data: once liberated through hacking from their objectifying role in the context of medical institution, open source data provides a commons upon which new forms of digital solidarity can emerge.47 In doing so they can trigger public responses which enable collective reappropriations of the experience of cancer and other illnesses. Against techno-determinist ideologies, we also suggest that, by performing such rituals, members of digital countercultures—such as hackers—can turn to digital technologies, rather than only their bodies, as a battleground for the reconfiguration of social and political possibilities.”

The chapter will be featured in the forthcoming “The Participatory Condition“, a book resulting from the international dialogues originating from “#PCond. The Participatory Condition“, an International Colloquium held in Montreal at the Museum of Contemporary Art on November 15 and 16, 2013. The Colloquium’s main objective was to assess the role of media in the development of a principle whose expansion has become so large as to become the condition of our contemporaneity. The book is forthcoming and will be published in 2016.

The chapter, in an early, pre-release version, can be accessed at: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/0744f82b#

You can cite the chapter as:

Delfanti, A. and Iaconesi, S., “Open Source Cancer. Brain Scans and the Rituality of Biodigital Data Sharing,” in Barney, D., Coleman, G., Ross, C., Sterne, J. and Tembeck, T. (eds): The Participatory Condition. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press (forthcoming).

 

 

Human Ecosystems: Digital Urban Acupuncture in Journal of Community Informatics

The article “Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media” has just been published on Journal of Community Informatics, Vol 10, No 3 (2014), Special Issue: Community Informatics and Urban Planning.

This is the abstract for the paper, presented in the Notes from the Field section:

Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media

The concept of Urban Acupuncture as applied to a contemporary vision of cities, between ubiquitous technologies, social networks, sensors and cloud computing. From the possibility to listen in real time to the digital life of the city to the opportunity to design and implement novel models for participatory, co-creation practices for city governance, planning, culture, tourism, citizen activation.

The paper describes the construction process of a methodology and of the required set of digital tools which allow to enact Urban Acupuncture practices in cities with high numbers of social media interactions

Two case studies are included for the City of Rome and the City of Turin, showing two practical applications in the domains of culture and of multiculturalism, respectively.

The two cases have been performed in collaboration and with the support of the city administrations and, in the final remarks, they are used to produce an evaluation of the proposed methodology and a series of focuses for further research and investigation.

 

You can access the article here: Urban Acupuncture in the era of Ubiquitous Media

Cite as:

Iaconesi, Salvatore, and Oriana Persico. “Urban Acupuncture in the Era of Ubiquitous Media.” Journal of Community Informatics 10, no. 3 (2014). http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/issue/view/49.
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